Monday, 5 September 2016

Totally addicted to… Mustard


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The dreaded condition known as “Man Flu” struck the human male resident of Fernglade Farm this week. The editor merely had a cold. Man Flu is defined as: “a cold or similar minor ailment as experienced by a man who is regarded as exaggerating the severity of the symptoms.”

Both the editor and I were sick for most of this week. It was an awful week because coughs, sneezes, and mucus were everywhere. Of course as the editor is of the female of the species, she deftly avoided the worst symptoms of the dread condition of Man Flu. Strong claims were made in the household that the female of the species is tougher than their male counterparts, and unfortunately I totally let down “Team Bloke” in that regard because I can’t deny that I have been a bit whingey. Team Bloke will have to work harder next time to make up for my recent poor performance, I guess, when ultimately another member of that team comes down with the dread condition of Man Flu. But it was a really bad cold! Sorry, that is merely another poor performance on my part for Team Bloke… Ladies, please spare a moment’s thought for the poor editor this week.

Bad colds aside (I did say that it was a really really bad cold!), I discovered a little secret cure-all from the garden when a person has been afflicted with the dread condition of Man Flu: Green and Red mustard leaves. Seriously!

We grow a huge quantity of mustard plants every year. The seeds for those mustard plants are collected at the end of each season for replanting the following season and we have done that process for many years now. The mustard plants are grown because they produce huge quantities of edible leafy green matter from autumn right through until about early summer. And we add those leaves to all manner of food. It is not just the humans that enjoy the mustard leaves, as even Toothy the long haired dachshund will happily graze on fresh mustard leaves.

However, by about this time of the year, the mustard leaves gain an epic heat quality and they will make your eyes water and induce a sense of pain in your brain (I describe that sensation by the technical term: “Brain Pain”). Horseradish, wasabi, and chilli all produce a similar sensation to brain pain. In previous years I have removed the mustard plants and fed them to the chickens because the mustard becomes so hot that it is painful to eat. Incidentally, chickens love the mustard leaves hot or not, and one can only deduce that they don’t seem to suffer from brain pain (edit: they have small heads and perhaps small brains too). Once the mustard plants are removed, I replant the clear raised garden beds with seeds which will produce younger and thus less hot mustard plants.

This year, we have been a bit busy and have neglected to remove the mustard plants. The chickens are a bit angry about this neglect, but they still enjoy plenty of fresh greens all the same. So, whilst I was suffering horribly from my debilitating cold (have I mentioned previously how horrible the cold was?) err, sorry, Man Flu, I snacked upon some green mustard leaves. My brain almost exploded from the epic heat of those mustard leaves. I had a brief vision of myself as existing in a scene from that horrific 1981 Canadian sci-fi horror film, Scanners, where for some strange reason a small group of evil people wanted to make other people’s heads explode and something, something, world domination. Making other people's heads explode doesn’t sound like a very nice thing to want to do? Anyway, dodgy Canadian sci-fi horror films aside, after the dust settled down in my brain, the resulting explosion had cleared both my sinuses and my headache. And they stayed clear for about half an hour afterwards. Needless to say, that this week I have consumed an epic amount of mustard leaves!

The only real problem became that once the symptoms of the dread condition of Man Flu eased off, I was unable to continue whingeing. This was much to the relief of the long suffering editor who to be fair was also sick this week with a minor cold, obviously it wasn’t the same as the Man Flu!

We grow mustard leaves in really close proximity and from autumn until about early summer the plants grow happily without any pests or diseases. Pest control is usually handled by the hard working Fairy Wrens and Red Breasted Robins that spend all day bouncing through the vegetable beds and garden beds consuming anything and everything that moves.
One of the many raised garden beds full of mustard plants here
Observant readers will note that in that raised garden bed there are: red mustard; green mustard; annual rocket; and a couple of types of lettuces.
Another of the raised garden beds with predominantly green mustard
The above photo shows another raised garden bed with predominantly green mustard. Now it is worth mentioning that green mustard is the hottest of the mustard plants. When I mean hot, I mean jalapeño style hot! The green mustard leaves may totally blow your mind Scanners style! The original green mustard plant was a chance gift from a local bloke who had been growing them in the area for over thirty years. It was a truly great gift.

The unfortunate thing about using the mustard leaves to gain a temporary recovery from the dread condition of Man Flu, was that I could no longer claim the benefits of Man Flu which include the awesome skill of skiving off work. Alas, work was soon calling…

Work involved laying another cubic metre (1.3 cubic yards) of composted woody mulch onto the new blackberry and strawberry plant enclosure. Over the next two years, that composted woody mulch will slowly turn into the most beautiful rich black sandy loam. And you can grow anything in that rich black loamy stuff.
Another cubic metre (1.3 cubic yards) of composted woody mulch was placed in the new strawberry enclosure
The blackberry canes will hopefully be planted over the next week or so in that area in the above photo in rows of rich compost which is yet to be laid down. Before the blackberry canes can be planted I have to consider the wallabies that if given the chance would happily eat all of them.
A wallaby enjoys the rich pickings at Fernglade Farm whilst I am monitoring the chickens in the orchard
And given that I had temporary relief from the dread condition of Man Flu, I was able to construct a steel (wallaby proof) gate using various chunks of scrap steel that I had to hand. Have I mentioned before how much I love my welder for metalwork? The welder was a gift from a neighbour and the device is clearly about forty years old, but it is the total biz and I must have the only solar powered welding service on the continent! The gate has now been painted with a coat of quality black metal paint and is waiting to be installed.
A wallaby proof steel gate was constructed this week using scrap metal which I had to hand
Skiving off work sounds nice, but unfortunately now that I had a steel gate ready to be installed I realised that there was no gate post to hang the new steel gate from. After a few mustard leaves, I was fortified to face the task of installing the gate post for the new wallaby proof blackberry enclosure. Whilst I was at it and feeling fighting fit (at least until the symptoms of the Man Flu returned) I also lined the pathway to that blackberry enclosure with a local rock quarried nearby which contains lots of lime. The local rock provides an all-weather, and yet permeable non slip surface. Plus, I hate mud, mustard leaves or not!
A gate post was installed for the blackberry enclosure and the pathway to the enclosure was lined with a local crushed rock containing good quantities of lime
Discovering the relief from the dread condition of Man Flu that the mustard leaves provided meant that I had enough energy – in between bouts of occasional whingeing – that I was also able to construct another concrete step on the new concrete staircase leading up to the new blackberry and strawberry enclosures.
Another concrete step on the staircase leading up to the new blackberry and strawberry enclosures was constructed today
The editor has begun painting coats of Tung Oil on the new cabinet which has recently been sanded to remove the walnut stain so as to reveal the natural timber colour. This is an important cabinet as it will be used to hide the multitude of fermenting products from the curious – but also unusually judgemental – eyes of visitors.
The third coat of Tung Oil was applied to the new cabinet which will hold the many fermenting products out of sight of visitors
Observant readers will note that the previous owners (or manufacturer), not only had the poor taste to stain the unit a walnut colour, but they also managed to use a router to gouge square grooves on the front of each cabinet draw front. These were a nightmare to sand. After a brief discussion, we arrived at the idea of using a small 12V electric rotating grinding stone to remove the stain from those grooves.

Before too long, the stain was removed from the grooves on the draw fronts. However, the process was not without hassles (or whingeing and surprisingly not from me this time) because the electric cord to this device over heated and melted and the device blew the fuse.
The small 12V electric rotating grinding stone original cable melted (black cable) and the device blew the nearest fuse
As you can see, I opened up the small device which was in otherwise good condition and replaced the original (black) and now melted under-rated electric cord with a more substantial cord (red and black) which will be unlikely to over-heat and melt in the future. I am sometimes gobsmacked by the sheer number of repairs to both small and large appliances that I am forced to do because so many of the original components are inadequate for the day to day purposes of the appliance.

Oh, we started a Swiss Brown mushroom kit this week too.
We started a Swiss Brown mushroom kit this week
The fruit trees are slowly breaking their winter dormancy and the almonds and the apricots have already produced blossoms. This week however, the plums have started to break their dormancy and produce blossoms.
The plums are breaking their winter dormancy this week
The bulbs have been multiplying over the past few years and they seem to love wet feet but with full sun. And there are plenty of bunches of daffodils now dotted about the farm.
There are now plenty of daffodil bunches dotted about the farm
Some of the more unusual bulbs are producing flowers now too and the grape hyacinth is a stunner and has a beautiful scent.
The grape hyacinth is a stunner
The hellebores are also continuing to produce flowers and I am seeing white, pink, and green flowers in the garden this week.
A white / pink hellebore produced flowers this week
At this time of year, the succulents can be some of the showiest of all flowers and the bees have been very happy with this plant.
A succulent produces a showy display of flowers this week
Last autumn, I decided to prune the gooseberry, red currant, and black currant shrubs because they were overgrowing the paths. At the time I decided rather than using the cuttings as compost feed, I would plant the cuttings into the ground. And then I forgot about those cuttings. To my absolute mustard fuelled astonishment, this week, the majority of those cuttings took and are now producing new plants and there are now dozens of them all over the place. Why would anyone buy these plants? Well perhaps having the dread condition of Man Flu might be an acceptable excuse!
One of the dozens of cuttings of gooseberry, red currant, and black currant beginning to form new plants
The temperature outside now at about 9.15pm is 8.0’C (46.4’F). So far this year there has been 761.2mm (30.0 inches) which is up from last week’s total of 748.0mm (29.4 inches).

83 comments:

margfh said...

Hi Pam,

I learn more every year about the chickens. Yesterday one of the Cornish Cross meat chickens (aka frankenbird) was found dead on his back in the chicken tractor - a heart attack I imagine. This is not an infrequent occurrence with these birds especially as they get quite large. We have a couple hot days coming up and I plan to put out a fan on them and be sure their water is cold. I sure don't want to lose anymore before they go in on Friday.

Hi Inge,

Our pigs are especially partial to ragweed as are the turkeys. Tomatoes are their favorite vegetable, zucchinis not so much.

Hi Lew,

I also purchased "Dark Age America" and have just started to read it. Looking forward to your review.
With the cyst I had removed from my jaw in January and now this root canal it'll be close to $4000 too. Not a good year in the tooth department.

Margaret

margfh said...

Hi Chris,

Well that's very interesting about the mustard. I think I've only grown it once. It does sound like you're finally recovering if you can do all that work. I'll bet the editor is happy about that. I think there's been a case or two of the man flu around here too. One advantage of being a teacher is after a year or two of catching everything one usually develops immunity to all the typical viruses. I'm still fortunate that I rarely get sick (knocking on wood as I write this).

Our apple and pear trees are pretty young but they're giving us a fairly good harvest and not too much damage either. The apple orchards all seem to have had a bad year around here.

The balloon fest sure tied up our town this weekend. Attendance was way above expectations so traffic and parking was a huge problem. On Saturday night we were able to see the balloons from our house. In fact one looked like is was going to land in our far north field but rose at the last minute. It was quite fun to watch. My mother-in-law was here for dinner. She is pretty much wheel chair bound but we had the gator out so she could ride around and check out the garden and animals. We were able to hustle her in time to drive down to the end of the road and watch the balloon which she very much enjoyed. Salve just barked viciously at it.

Margaret

orchidwallis said...

Hello Chris

My first comment has managed to arrive at your last weeks post, sorry.

I did a second one for Pam, don't know where that is going.

Inge

LewisLucanBooks said...

Yo, Chris - Oh, you can still get a lot of mileage out of the Man Flu. "Remember when I had the Man Flu last spring?" Or even better, "Was that before or after I had the Man Flu, last year?" :-). Hmmm. I wonder if the bloke you got the mustard from was a bit of an herbalist. I wonder if he was breeding for heat? And, is there a way to preserve that heat for times when the mustard crop does not produce optimum heat?

So, do you think the lime from the paths percolates through the soil a bit?

Back when I used to refinish a bit of furniture, stain or paint in groves and carvings was always a fiddly problem. Over the years I picked up various steel dental tools that helped with the job. Think I've still got them in my kit, somewhere. Could wrap the heads in a bit of steel wool or sandpaper. Maybe a few drops of solvent and steel wool. Heat gun and soft wire brush was another way to go. It was always exasperating and you had to be so careful not to gouge the wood or rub sandpaper or steel wool against the grain.

I've got quit a few grape hyacinths in the yard and this is what they look like ...

http://images.fineartamerica.com/images-medium-large-5/grape-hyacinth-carol-groenen.jpg

Since they're blue, I'm always separating bulbs and establishing new patches, here and there. I'll have to remember to take a few bulbs along with me to The Home. They're usually about 6 inches tall.

I picked up a new book from the library that I think I'm going to have to get for my cook book collections. "Best Cobblers and Crisps Ever: No-Fail Recipes for Rustic Fruit Deserts" Sweeney, 2016. I had a good laugh at the introduction. It explained the difference between cobblers, crisps, crumbles, grunts, slumps, betties and buckles. :-). I have a suspicion that what to call these various deserts has a lot to do with geography and ethnic background of the recipe source. Getting the book will expand my pot luck repertoire. You can feed more people with a tray of something and they're easier to put together than a pie ... or pies. LOL. "Rustic fruit desert ... " How's that for PR? Lew

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Pam,

This comment from Inge to you appeared in last weeks post. I can't edit the comment posts or where they land...

orchidwallis said...

@ Pam

An attempt here to answer your question. When my husband was dying he was very concerned about my future and thought that I should go to Australia as both my daughters are there. On my next visit down under afterwards, I carefully considered it and decided 'no'.

I find Australia more American than British (this remark annoys Australians) and had also discarded my sister's suggestion that I go to the US where she lives. I find myself to be extremely English and love the country. Also the British old age pension does not upgrade annually in certain countries including Australia. So I remain here where my only blood relative is my son.

I admit that I live in isolation, not a neighbour in sight and in fact I sold my previous residence and moved even further into the woods. How long can this continue? I don't know. I absolutely love my life and son and friends do keep an eye. If I moved to another country it would be to one that permitted euthanasia. I was responsible for both my husband and my mother when they became incapacitated and donot want to inflict this onerous duty on anyone else.

When I am driven out to shop, I look in horror at the streets of houses all cheek by jowl. I don't think that I could stand to live in one anymore. I don't at all like the sort of future that Lew is envisaging, am definitely a loner. So who knows what will happen. My mother lived to be 94 though she was twice my weight. That was what finally stopped her walking. All in the lap of the gods. Even if one organises everything the fates can knock it sideways.

I am interested in all comments.

Inge

TalkingTrees said...

Hello Chris

Thanks for your compost/mulch advice concerning the construction of new vegetable beds. I've double dug some sections this year - virgin ground - not something I ever do but I needed to get some horse manure underneath and wanted a much quicker fix than sheet mulching, which is standard practice here. We have Swiss friends who have a magnificent fenced and netted garden cum orchard and they give us so much produce that when we lost our veg garden to a new road we became a bit too complacent and were slow to begin the new garden. Well, the weather also intervened. We need the new garden even more now because recent retirement and choosing to age in place rather than cashing our farm in means relatively straightened circumstances. I say relative because we are enormously well off and comfortable here but not in a monetary sense.

I'm glad to read of your and the editor's recovery. I always feel as if I am burning daylight if I'm too sick/tired to work on whatever needs to be done. This causes my husband a great deal of amusement because from his point of view the work never goes away and there's always time and the need to enjoy life, friends, playing music and whatever comes along. Hopefully we balance each other out.

We built some cupboards in our living areas that are basically built in wardrobes but one functions as a utility cupboard, the other as a pantry. Such cupboards were built in farmhouses in the Wimmera early last century. They take all of our food and wine supplies, which occasionally draw surprised comments from town dwellers. Living out of town changes the way you organize your supplies. Living carefully, growing and preserving your own food also takes organized spaces. We only made wine once. We bought a lovely Jim beam oak barrel for the purpose. Unfortunately we bought it from a Greek Australian who had used it for retsina and our lovely Shiraz grapes became retsina Shiraz.

Inge, as an Australian I'm not annoyed about your comment about the Americanization of aspects of Australian culture. I find our accent is softening with exposure to US media/culture. However, travelling as an Australian in parts of the US can be tricky because our accent seems to be often impenetrable to Americans. Mind you, I live in the bush and any changes within the culture are probably less noticeable.

Warm Regards, Helen

Coco said...

I must say I´m amazed at what you get done, even when suffering from dramatic, gender-related illness.

We´ve had lots of family visiting during the traditional August vacation period, and I have to say I´m ready to become a hermit and never see anyone again for months. With the possible exception of DH and the dog. Community may be really important, but I find it exhausting.

Are your concrete steps individual blocks cast on top of one another? Or are they anchored mechanically?

If you were to recommend a very basic water collection system for first timers, what would it be? Unfortunately, I´d like the water up hill from the house and there are no roofing surfaces. This is the second summer of months on end of high temperatures and no rain. I sense a pattern developing.

Do you make mustard from your mustard seeds?

Hope you´re now back to your robust, unwhingey self.

orchidwallis said...

Hello again

Thank you Chris for moving my comment to Pam. It is all my fault when moving from week to next week.

Yesterday I tried to buy some suitable cook books for my previously mentioned friends. I wanted a simple freezer book and pickling book. No such luck. Stacks and stacks of cook books. Paleo diet, diabetic diet, gluten free and endless elaborate books. Not a single freezer/pickling or even a basic cookbook. No wonder no-one cooks anymore, much to frightening and difficult.

@ Helen

I believe that the Australian accent originated from the London cockney accent, but could be wrong.

Inge

Jo said...

Chris, remember, you are a delicate snowflake, and should definitely consider taking several weeks off for convalescence.

I'm with Lew - those hyacinths are lovely, but they are not grape hyacinths..

I am also in love with those pale pink hellebores. I have the liver coloured ones popping up in my new garden. They are quite pleasant, but yours are stunning. I will have to look out for some.

@ Lew - I looked up Ruth Goodman's books at your recommendation. My library doesn't have the Tudor book, but I just collected the Victorian one and am enjoying it very much. A lot to consider there for those of us who are collapsing early. Thanks for the book recommendations, and keep them coming:)

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Lewis,

Well that comparison is true. Also when you compare that 1918 flu pandemic to contact between early Europeans and indigenous peoples the mortality rates reach up into 90% of the population for the indigenous peoples. Maybe those sci-fi films feed on the fear of retribution from the Golden Rule? Even mortality rates of 30% to 60% of the population with the Black Death is quite shocking to consider and in the Middle Ages, the sheer number of deaths was far greater than in 1918. Downton Abbey included a couple of Spanish flu victims in its story line.

Hey, out of sheer curiosity, why is the plague more prevalent in the western half of the US than the eastern half?

Thanks for the Orlov link and I will check it out. I do enjoy a podcast.

Really, it got down to a sense of elitism? Aren't they the sore losers? Well you and the clerical staff were in the trenches, whilst the "licensed" librarians were the generals sitting in their tents comfortably out of harms way. Whilst at the same time, those generals appeared to be leading the troops into a very unpleasant situation, in perhaps also the wrong location... Just sayin! ;-)! I rarely get to see quiet moments in the work front these days. It is my opinion that we need to sometimes stand back and contemplate (but not overdo that either). Alas we have lost our middle ground (again!).

It is very nice that your relatives had the good common grace to drop off their perches during the middle of the day. I have to consider whether that was true down here as well. I'm not so sure from my experience. But calls during the wee hours are usually better made in the light of day. Family can be a mixed bag. I see plenty of happy families, but also just as many unhappy families. If it means anything, I've noted that people in happy families seem to concentrate their energies into the family itself and they tend to struggle seeing the world beyond that unit. Of course that is an unpalatable point of view, but my family were very dysfunctional so I stepped outside that unit to see what was out there in the world. Not everyone does that. Most of my friends – but not all - are a bit distant from their parents for whatever reason.

The people at the post office here are really nice and we are on a first name basis and I can access their service on a Sunday if need be and there are no complaints and in turn I support their business during the slow times of the year like the dead of winter. Everyone wins. Where I live is a bit remote and so couriers are reluctant to deliver here, and the postal service definitely won't. I can't complain, but if I did receive the sort of call that you made, I would act on it. Everyone is different in that regard though.

Ha! My inner twelve year old says: Too bad, so sad, dude! If people put a hold down and don't bother acting on it, too bad for them. Out of curiosity, did people have to put any money down when they made a "hold" on a book?

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Angus,

The crud may have entered your pipes via the water tank. The stainless steel mesh inlet filters only stop large particles of organic matter (check your guttering out to see what may be pouring into that). All of the smaller particles then accumulate on the bottom of the water tank. When the valve is opened on the water tank, some of that sludge gets sucked into the pipe and hopefully out of the tap.

One inch blue line is very good quality pipe. In fact it is as good as you can install. I use the green line which is of a slightly lesser grade (an economic decision). The organic matter will flush out when the tap is run for a little bit and for the garden that organic matter is a free feed. And if you are at all uncomfortable about the organic matter then it is worth recalling that wombats and wallabies all happily do their business in the areas surrounding reservoirs – not to mention the fish, platypus etc... I wouldn't worry about it too much. My house pump sometimes sucks gunk out of the bottom of the water tanks, but it does clear the lines very quickly.

Oh yeah, you are spot on about water hammer. It is a real problem. When I volunteered for the local fire brigade and we refilled the tankers at the valves in town, they were forever telling us to turn them off slowly so that the water hammer didn't destroy the town water mains! Some of the old water mains were timber…

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Inge,

Thanks for passing over the Man Flu business, you are very nice and also very diplomatic.

Yeah, that was my conclusion as well. Thus the serious need for a form of initiation and also a form of mentoring. Still divided we can be conquered! If you were wondering, I write the blog so as to get the ideas out there into the world and maybe some good will come of that. Plus, I do so enjoy all of our dialogue.

A truffle pig is clearly more intelligent than a truffle dog if it is quick enough to consume the truffle whilst also proving its worth at finding the fungi in the first place. You got me wondering and apparently after a bit of reading I have learned that down here, the place is rich with a diversity of native truffles (whether they are edible or not is another question) - far more than Europe. I do dig them up from time to time and then re-bury them as I realise they would not appreciate being dug up.

Thanks for sharing your experience with the pigs as I have absolutely no experience with those lovely creatures at all. I assume that the piglets will get through the winter? Maybe. Your son may have very precocious piglets would he choose them to breed from?

Lucky you being inundated with vegetables. Beetroot wine sounds pretty nice. Hey, we made tomato wine from the summer harvest and after about six months the stuff smells, looks, and tastes exactly like a good white wine. That is very strange but confirmed by an independent taste tester recently. Free potatoes! What good neighbours, I hope they don't realise what they are missing out on any time soon?

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Margaret,

You may be interested to know that the mustard plants are also a bio-fumigant which will clean up the soil a bit after disease prone crops such as tomatoes. As it is a winter (autumn to spring) crop here you can grow it following those crops or in the following season as an off year crop like the old timers used to do. Or try inter planting it with those disease prone crops... ;-)! Like garlic around fruit trees…

Actually, I haven't quite recovered yet, it was one bad cold. Oh no I’ve started whining again! I found the work to be very clearing of the mind and sinuses. Oh yeah, the editor is happy to see less Man Flu symptoms though. The poor editor...

Yes, touch wood is the correct response. Of course your exposure level is high and so your immunity has a good time to build up a solid response to the regular nasties.

Sorry to hear about the bad year for your local orchards. I assume the bad year was due to the humidity? My suggestion is to feed the soil around your trees and they will be more resilient. Trees are just like people and animals in that regard.

Those balloons would have been great fun to watch and fortunately it didn't land in your field! Glad to read that your mother-in-law enjoyed them as well. Salve is a dog and perhaps a hot air balloon is a bit much for his brain. When I lived in the inner city, I thought one of them was going to hit my house one early Sunday morning on its way into Edinburgh Park.

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Inge,

Thanks!

I agree with you in that Australia is closer to the US than the UK now, but it is a hybrid of the two cultures and not either - much like Canada which is the closest culturally. New Zealand, I found to be closer culturally to the UK than here and you probably would have enjoyed it there.

Cheers

Chris

orchidwallis said...

Hello again

My son was told that he would find New Zealand a perfect country for himself.

Inge

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Lewis,

Yeah, maybe I can? I like how your brain works! Hmmm, so you reckon one year down the track I can still bring back memories of Man Flu symptoms? Do you believe that the editor may fall for that trick? The possibilities are endless... Did your mum ever say that you may possibly have been a bad influence? I do like your style though. Hehe!!!

I dunno about that guy being a herbalist, although I guess he knew enough on the subject. I became friends with him about a year before dementia set in with him. He had an awesome edible garden and I knew him through the local seed savers group. I didn't like him when I first met him, but after a while I got to understand his very quirky and dry sense of humour. He used to help me with the bees and I was very grateful for the help. Unfortunately once dementia kicked in he retreated and then moved from his larger property into town. The retreat was into himself too.

As to times when there is no mustard, well, that is when Vietnamese mint and Horseradish come into their own as brain pain inducers! ;-)! Nature does provide. Those plants are so easy to grow and propagate too.

For sure, the lime leaches from the rock paths into the surrounding soil and water table. It is very acidic here, so all around the lime paths the plants are doing very well...

The dental tools providing the rounded edge to tackle the sand paper and the groove in the furniture is a great idea. The rotating grinding stone was very quick to gouge the timber - as you correctly point out - and you had to have a steady hand to do that particular job. Still, once the job is done, it is done. We put another coat of Tung Oil on the cabinet today. Did you know, I was reading the detailed instructions and they've added a polyurethane epoxy compound to the Tung Oil. I could not believe it. Too late now…

Those grape hyacinths are very attractive and removing some of the bulbs is a great idea. It would be a travesty if they were lost due to the actions of an excavator or some other construction travesty. Mine are clearly not grape hyacinths...

A cook book titled: No-Fail Recipes for Rustic Fruit Deserts, is clearly a winner. I'd never heard of a Cobbler (not to mention a Grunt!) before, but then in the UK they have a dessert called a Fool which looks like an ice cream mash with fruit? Dunno.

You wouldn't believe it but I saw an article on the weather website: Early-season heat builds across Australia. 40'C is 104'F. It is like some sort of disaster porn. Unfortunately, when the winds blow from the NW over summer, that is where they come from... Fortunately for the moment, Thursday is forecast to be 23'C (73.4'F) before an epic rain storm hits and the place cools down again... I've been to Fitzroy Crossing too.

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Helen,

Yeah, exactly, double digging speeds the whole process up as it turns the clay and rocks into the manure. There are plenty of ways to improve soil fertility and I do have a book by the excellent author: Jackie French, titled: Soil Food, 1372 ways to improve the fertility of your soil. It was an eye opener! Yeah, the problem with relying on other peoples systems is that they may one day move, and yes, I totally hear you and we are in the same boat!

Time is a funny thing isn't it? I have always felt the pressure of time passing too, but as you say there is always middle ground there. When I was the sickest, I took out the stump grinder and ripped up some old tree stumps. I don't whether that was a good idea, but I did feel better having done that?

Thanks for sharing your story about the preserves and other fermented goodies. That Jim Beam oak barrel story was (sorry to say) quite amusing. You may be interested to read that we made tomato wine last summer and I have a NZ friend who is very fond of Sav Blanc and she reckons it almost tastes the same as a good Marlbrough...

You are spot on about the bush being very slow to change. I can see that change in the city though and that is sometimes why I write about my travels into the big smoke of Melbourne. The CBD is a very Asian and cosmopolitan city now. Remembering it back from 20 years ago, the city was dead at night. Not so now.

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Coco,

Thanks for writing that. That was a very funny description too. :-)!

Yeah, I enjoy time with people too, but I tend to need a bit of recovery and quiet time after that. Have I mentioned that I've volunteered to man a stall at a local plant fair soon? Quiet time!!!

Yes, the concrete steps are formed one at a time. Each step sits partially on the previous step underneath it, and steel reinforcing rods (usually scraps) are inserted into the back of each step. It is all very strong and they have never moved in many years now. My neighbour was admiring them the other day.

I'll have to have a think about a basic water system. But something like my chicken shed is a good example. It has a tank which is filled from the roof of the chicken shed. Then there is a pipe which feeds that stored water into a garden tap in the chicken shed itself.

Of course, moving water up hill requires a pump. However, if you are able to fill the tank during the winter using town water, why not? You can then run a pipe to various water taps about the place using only gravity and the whole thing is too easy. Of course, you have to refill the tank and not use so much that you run out of water.

I've never thought of doing that! Is that how mustard is made? There are so many varieties. My favourite is Dijon mustard, but I do like hot English mustard too. Yum! What are your favourites?

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Jo,

Yes, now that you mention it, I am a delicate snowflake and a couple of weeks off would do me the world of good. Of course, that won't get the blackberries, strawberries, tomatoes, zucchini, pumpkins, onions, potatoes... OMG! Far out, I can't afford to get sick...

Thanks for the correction, I will have to check out the bulb shop when it reopens next year, unless you can identify which type of hyacinth it is? Are there lots of them?

Thank you, they are worth looking out for. A local nursery called the Post Office nursery specialises in them. Also the diggers club sells "Black" hellebores which I did buy, but it hasn't flowered this year... I saw them at Bunnings today, but they wanted like $24 each and I thought to myself no way. They would grow like weeds in your garden!

The Ruth Park books turned up too.

Cheers

Chris

W. B. Jorgenson said...

Hi Chris,

According to an ornithologist (bird scientist) I'm friends with, most compounds that react with our heat receptors only have this effect on mammals. In other words, your chickens can't taste the mustard as hot, thus why they always like it. Apparently it has to do with these plants being able to survive bird digestive tracks but not mammal ones, so they've evolved this neat trick of making a mammal who eats it feel like their mouth is being burnt.

Spicy food does seem to clear the sinuses, although I don't know why. Not that it really matters: it's good enough to know it works.

And you have quite a lot of flowers it seems. I hope the bees are happy with them!

LewisLucanBooks said...

@ Margaret - I think my oral surgeon is finally getting it. I do not intend to spend more money or have the inclination to do any more major work on my teeth. Maybe the odd extraction. I can get those done for $30 at the poor people's clinic. Well. The first session of the Fern Glade Farm book club is now called to order :-). I'll be interested to see what you think of Dark Age America. Oh, gosh. I've hijacked Chris' blog. I know. Go set up one of my own.

@ Inge - Well, it's not the way I wanted things to turn out (Moving into the Home), but here we are. I may just hold up in my apartment and have groceries delivered to the door. Or, as there is quit a large park / wildlife area behind the place, I may just occasionally go screaming into the woods. Live rough for a few days. Good practice for when the whole thing collapses and I end up living under a bridge :-). Not outside the realm of possibility.

@ Jo - Ruth Goodman is just full of useful information. Your library might get the Tudor book, eventually. If you have the time, check out some of her programs on YouTube. Just do a search for "Ruth Goodman." Lew

SLClaire said...

Hi Chris,

I'm glad you and the editor feel better. Mike and I rarely get sick, fortunately. He doesn't really whine much though (that's the US spelling I'm using) on the rare occasions he gets sick. Mostly he sleeps. I'm more likely to whine but also more likely to attempt to keep going despite being sick.

Mustard is limited to a spring and a fall crop here; winter is too cold and summer is too hot for it. We both like mustard greens and I have grown several different varieties over the years. I like the looks and taste of Osaka Purple but chose to grow a green variety, Chinese Thick Stem, this fall.

I know what you mean about the leaves getting hot as they mature! But I haven't had a cold in so long that I haven't tried eating any leaves at that time. We like horseradish a lot and it happens that something like 50% of the US supply is grown within a few miles of our house, in the Mississippi River bottomland on the Illinois side a little south of St. Louis. The bottomland is 15 to 20 miles wide there and the climate is very good for horseradish. Each year the town of Collinsville holds an International Horseradish Festival in a local park. We like to go there and buy a root, which we grind into some excellent hot horseradish. That's always on hand and I well know the brain flash from it. Next time I have sinus trouble (which I get more often than colds) I will try horseradish and see if it helps.

We had beautiful cool weather last Friday and Saturday, but it is hot and humid again today. Still, a few trees like dogwood whose leaves start turning color early show that autumn is not far away. I hope we get the predicted rain on Thursday and Friday and the cool weekend following. Much work to do in the garden to prepare for next year, especially more new vegetable beds to dig and also a new flowerbed to prepare and fill with native flowers to attract pollinators.

Claire

LewisLucanBooks said...

Yo, Chris - I really don't know why we have plague in the West and not in the East. Might be the different rodent populations. I know prairie dogs are a reservoir for plague.

Oh, yeah. There's definitely a sense of elitism among the accredited librarians. I think the thing is that it's pretty much an open secret the whole "professional" thing is pretty bogus and that there isn't much that can't be learned "on the job." I once pushed a young librarian on that point and the best she could come up with was "well, I spent all that money." From a clerical point of view, we think more of the librarian who will turn their hand to a bit of clerical stuff when things get wild and push comes to shove. If they're at loose ends. Some will and some won't.

If someone special ordered a book in the bookstores I worked in, we didn't ask for a deposit (but, probably should have). Putting a book on hold at the library is free. But, every time I place an interlibrary loan request (from a different system) they always ask how much I would be willing to pay. This has been going on for years, and I've never been charged. I don't know what that's all about.

Epoxy in the tung oil? That's ghastly. It occurred to me that the epitaph for our benighted industrial civilization is going to be "They Couldn't Leave Well Enough Alone."

Sounds like you may have a scorcher, coming up this summer. Cool and rainy here, today.

When I was looking around, online, for the cheapest copy of the cobbler / crisp book, I also ran across a reference to something called "pan dowdy." Defined as "apple cobbler type" and "combo of pie and pudding." I think a lot of these recipes can be traced back to colonial times. The original recipes where pretty simple and were more forgiving as far as oven temperatures went. Or, open fire cooking.

I had a bit of a laugh at that "rustic deserts." I can imagine someone, somewhere along the line at the publishing house saying "We can probably sell a few more copies if we work "rustic" into the title." :-). Rustic. A term right up there with "artisanal" as being a lot of sound and fury signifying ... not much. "Handmade" isn't good enough? "Small scale?" They Couldn't Leave Well Enough Alone. Indeed. Lew

TalkingTrees said...

Hello

My understanding of the English variations spoken in Canada, Australia, South Africa and New Zealand emerged from similar migrant groups around similar historical times and that there are similar characteristics. The differences seem to be heard in the vowels and the hardness or softness of consonants. Americans I've met can't hear much difference between New Zealand English and Australian English. It's also interesting to hear the growing regional differences within Australia, created by newer migrant groupings, like the Italian migrants in the Queensland cane field areas and the development of the Queensland 'eh' at the beginning, end or middle of a sentence, sometimes all three.

Inge, I think you are right about the early cockney influence on our accent but with lots of other interferences or overlays. Class intervenes too and there has been a softening and Australianization of public speech from the early days of radio and television.

Chris, the retsina Shiraz was doubly painful because the histamine levels were so high that those who tried it found it slowed all movement. We had fun making it but it was seriously undrinkable.

All of the wild plum trees along our creek are blooming along with the wattles. The scent is thick in the air.

Lewis, I enjoy your comments, thoughtfulness and insights. Books are sadly not quite back on my agenda after the long dark of doctoral work but I enjoy reviews, discussion and opinions about them. I hope to find my way back to reading via comments such as yours and everyone else.

Warmest Regards, Helen

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi W.B,

Thanks for the explanation. It sounds quite reasonable. You may be interested to know that most of the animals (and native birds) leave the mustard greens alone. The wallaby may try some mustard leaves occasionally, but there are far tastier morsels for that destructor of gardens!

Exactly, the biology and chemistry is beyond me anyway, but I do know that a tasty salsa with some serious chili will induce brain pain. I'm quite partial to hot curries too from time to time. Do you have good Indian food in Canada? There are some very good places in Melbourne for that cuisine.

Yeah, the old guy that helped me originally with the bees, said I didn't have enough food here for the bees and I should grow some more flowers. Probably like you would, I then asked question: How much area should I set aside for growing flowers for the bees. And he responded by saying: Grow more flowers. And around and around that conversation went, so I dropped the conversation and just started planting a diverse range of flowers all over the place. They make a huge difference to the quantity and variety of life here. It is hard to gauge the exact impact of all of the flowers, but it is pretty massive. There are at least some flowers here every day of the year. Many of the old accounts of the continent indicate that it was once covered in a huge variety of wildflowers.

Cheers

Chris

orchidwallis said...

Hello again

Son doesn't want to have more than 2 sows so he doesn't usual breed his piglets.

A daughter has just told me that she roasts beetroot. I had never thought of that.

Inge

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Claire,

Ah yes, we are quite similar in that I too rarely get sick, but at such times, I tend to leave sleep to my normal hours and like you I keep trying to go on as there really is a lot to do, albeit at a slower pace. The occasional whine (US spelling) isn't much of a drama, such things are best enjoyed in moderation anyway.

The mustards bolt to seed here over summer too, unless I used massive quantities of water on the plants and kept them in the shade, and even then they would still bolt to seed. Your winters are tough (from my perspective of having a milder winter) to take into account in your garden as the requirement to preserve produce becomes that much greater.

That Chinese thick stemmed mustard is a fascinating looking plant and it has so much leaf matter. Thanks for the tip. The Osaka purple mustard is very similar to what I call red mustard. I like that mustard as it has a milder kick than the green mustard. Seed catalogues are great to pour over whilst you decide what to grow and it is always good when a new variety turns out really well.

Oh yeah, the closer those plants get to late spring, the hotter they become! Ouch! Thanks for the info on the Collinsville International Horseradish Festival. That is fantastic. Out of curiosity, how do you grind the horseradish root and is it dried or fresh beforehand? I have plenty of plants here, but so far have been using them for their leaves which are very summer heat hardy and the chickens like them. The leaves interestingly enough also have a spicy taste.

I found a proper ginger root which appears to have over wintered outside in the conditions, so I'm hoping that that plant takes and grows well.

You know a similar thing happened here last autumn. It was still warm to hot and the trees decided to go deciduous so they must be sensitive to the number of daylight hours as well as the general climate.

I hope that you get the predicted rain too. It is meant to rain quite heavily here on Friday too and the heat is slowly building up to that point. I look forward to reading about your flower garden next spring.

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Lewis,

Oh yeah, you did mention the prairie dogs as carriers of the plague a while back. I wonder if humans have built up much of a resistance to the plague since the middle ages? Hmmm, I just looked up modern treatments and it seemed to indicate that basic antibiotics can do the trick, but there was a note about getting started on treatment within the first 24 hours (much like rabies) or risk death. Ouch. I'll bet the occasional misdiagnosis occurs... The editor listened to a podcast recently about a lady who was attacked by a rabid squirrel and the subsequent hassles that her and family had with the medical authorities between one county and the next. Talk about time running out...

Qualifications are used more often than not as a barrier to entry for a profession. I have always had a suspicion that the employers have somehow managed to outsource the costs (and risk) for vocational training onto the employees whereas historically they used to provide for that. It is little wonder that people get a bit antsy about such things when they have spent so much time and money in order to obtain a qualification. The whole thing is sold on the basis of experience (your college system) and status (which is an ephemeral thing).

If it means anything to you, I was always at the coal face as I had started employment at the very bottom of the ladder and worked my way right up, whilst studying part-time at night. I enjoy the more hands on work and even trained someone who had no educational background to do the job just because that was the best outcome for the company – not that they appreciated that. I bumped into that lady in Melbourne a few weeks back and they were really happy to see me and I got a big hug which was nice but rather unexpected.

Thanks for explaining that hold situation. I was wondering about it because sometimes people get a bit weird about things they have not paid for and someone once explained it to me that in such situations people do not value those things. I don't work that way, but I see it often enough that I have no doubts some other people do. Dunno.

Yeah, that's funny. They probably put the epoxy in because: We asked for it...

Perhaps. My gut feeling says that it will be intermittently very hot and then very wet, and then back to very hot again this summer. Enjoy your cool rainy weather! Today was almost a perfect spring day here. I ended up spending the afternoon getting the water pump and one tap and a bushfire sprinkler installed this afternoon using the new "semi-permanent infrastructure system" (or SPIS!!!). It hurts to dump infrastructure and start again from scratch, but what else do you do? The ground was certainly wet around one of the joins, but it is wet everywhere so I really don't know if that was the problem. I may try to join the new system back into the old system to see if the rest of it works. It is worthwhile trying stuff out like that.

cont...

Cherokee Organics said...

That is funny as! A pan dowdy! Fancy that. I keep getting thoughts of a pan dandy for some reason whatever that means. Yeah, the old school recipes are pretty forgiving. I cook with a wood oven and one has to have a very understanding and keep a watchful eye on that temperature and be prepared to act quickly, or just slow cook the food on a low heat. That technique of slow cooking makes the best biscuits.

Plus, did I mention that I accidentally ran out of butter. It has been about six weeks since I went to the shop. So I rummaged around the cupboard and found: Coconut Oil. That worked out not too bad as a substitute in the biscuits. It didn't taste quite as good as the butter, but if I purchased the same biscuit elsewhere I'd be pretty happy. I may try cooking a vegan Anzac biscuit!

I laugh too at all of those misused words. My favourite is the use of the word: Myriad - in real estate blurbs. The funny thing is that 99 times out of 100, the person will write “Myriad of options”, rather than just “Myriad options” (for example). Alas, the English as we know it is changing and one day “Myriad of” will be acceptable by default!

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Helen,

That is so true. I can now distinguish between a Canadian accent and an American accent. However, sometimes just to stir them up a bit for a laugh I deliberately ask Canadians (sorry W.B, I have some Canadian friends here and they are lovely people, but I do enjoy the occasional bit of prankster activity) what part of America they are from! :-)!

Oh yeah, the regionalism in accents is growing here too. In South Australia (sorry, Angus but it is true), they pronounce the word "dance" or "chance" using a more plum English pronunciation, whereas in Victoria those words are pronounced in a very flat way.

I have noticed that quite a few people have worked hard at developing a very "proper" accent and some of them are quite young. It is fascinating, but I am not the sort to want or seek to stand out in a crowd.

Oh no! For your interest, I have noticed that the sulphur used to kill the yeast and thus stop further fermentation gives me a hay-fever like reaction. It is a mild poison after all. With my brewing I do not add the sulphur compounds (sometimes known as Camden tablets) and I suffer no allergic reaction to any of the wines. I noticed that "sulphur free" organic wines are available to purchase nowadays and I usually take a bottle of that if I'm heading over to other people’s houses for food and that also does not give me an allergic reaction. Dunno.

The wattle smells beautiful doesn't it? On warm nights the forest here is perfumed with that scent. Wild plums put on quite the show too.

Cheers

Chris

Damo said...

I have no idea where the Australian 'drawl' came from, but Laos people often struggle to understand me even when I am almost sure I have the words correct. Of course, I consider myself tone-deaf and Laos has 5 tones, so yeah that doesn't help either!

There has been a whirlwind of excitement here in sleepy Luong Prabang thanks to the first ever visit of a sitting US president. It is funny, I have not heard a single negative comment, which is telling when you consider that Laos is the most bombed country on the planet. The past couple of weeks has seen daily flights of the huge military cargo planes dropping off dozens of vehicles and equipment. Stiff-looking Americans with military haircuts have been running around town and the local police deployed an officer every 10m along the main roads today! And after all that, he only visited for about 6 hours. Still, Obama has pledged 90 million to help clean up the unexploded ordinance which is still killing and maiming today. So that is a positive outcome.

(Australian PM Malcolm Turnbull was also in Laos today, but no one cares :p)

LewisLucanBooks said...

@ Claire - The other half of the US horseradish crop is growing back in my unused chicken run :-). Interesting how some small towns have little festivals, sometimes tied to food. Around here there's Egg Days, Cheese Days and a Garlic Festival. Poor Elma didn't get on the band wagon fast enough and there was naught left. So, they have a yearly Slug Festival :-).

@ Helen - Don't know what I'd do without me 'ooks. :-).

Yo, Chris - What's interesting is that in recent years, they've found that some people have a gene that makes them resistant to plague. And the same gene also makes people immune to HIV/AIDs. So far, found in Northern Europeans.

Well. College. Here, the big story is ITT Technical Institute has been shut down. After being around for about 50 years. Late night television will take a hit, as there will no longer be ad revenue from them. They were a for profit outfit with a lot of on line classes. But also, campuses scattered about. The government cut off their ability to convince their students to take out student loans. They tried to sell up but there were no buyers. So. People who are carrying debt from this outfit can discharge the debt. But not if they can manage to transfer credits to a legitimate institution.

I was also thinking about how when I was taking some on line library courses (from the University of Maine ... not ITT :-) that there was a wide age range of students. What I thought was odd/interesting was that many of the younger students thought they could just take the library courses and waltz out of college and into a library job without ever having worked in a library. It was pointed out by us oldsters, that that might be possible, but if they wanted an edge they should probably get ANY kind of a library job. Even if it was volunteer. Well. That didn't go over very well. Maybe if they had called it "unpaid intern" instead of volunteer .... But that was a few years back and "intern" wasn't so much in the news. I volunteered quit a few months to "get my foot in the door" to get my last library job. No big deal. Maybe 8 hours a week. And that job lasted 12 years and got me a small pension. Cont.

LewisLucanBooks said...

Cont. Went to town, yesterday. I had a craving for fish and chips and have made the acquaintance of someone who slings hash in a bar that serves them up. The bar is called "Rum Runners" and has the whole Key West / Pirate vibe going on. Lots of diving helmets and fish nets. A really nice aquarium. The fish and chips were quit good, but I'm just not used to all that fried. LOL, I was pretty uncomfortable the rest of the day.

There's also a new opportunity store. Actually, a third outpost of the local Visiting Nurses (Hospice) thrift. Picked up a few books and a really nice cobalt blue glass vase. A 12" tall cylinder with a crackle finish. Thought it might be "something", but now, I think not. Still, it's quit nice looking at at 79 cents ... (pence?).

So. Let's hope the SPIS doesn't SPIT. :-). I know what you mean about dumping infrastructure. I dislike doing anything twice. Like dusting or cleaning the bog. :-).

Re: The epoxy. Not only did we ask for it, I'm sure it's for our convenience. :-). Lew

Pam in Virginia said...

@ Inge:

I found your comment to me in last week's comments. Thank you so much for being so thoughtful, and forthright. I entirely sympathize with your wanting to stay in England, where your roots are. Maybe it was a little easier to make that decision since you have traveled pretty extensively? Because you have so much to compare your homeland with?

I used to think that I was a loner; I certainly spend all of my time within a really small circle of people (I work at home, so that is part of it). But I have spent the last 36 years living in a house with other people, sometimes a fairly large group, so I have not had much chance to find out if my early tendencies of "lonership" really still fit me! It has certainly been a wonderful opportunity to learn how to compromise and be flexible; I wouldn't trade that for anything. I enjoy going into town once or twice a week; it adds variety and interest to life, but I am always so happy, even joyful, when my tires hit our dirt road and I know that I am almost home, in the country.

I cannot offer an opinion on euthanasia. The only end-of-life experiences that I have had have been with animals, and there seems to me to be a different sort of responsibility in play there. Our family is so small, and so far I have always been in another place when one of my elderly relatives has passed on. No one has died young in my family, at least not before their 60's. Most have lived well into their 80's and even upper 90's. Having had quite a lot of pain in my life, I know how easy it is to want to give in to that, and give up, but I also know how quickly things can turn around, so I might find it quite hard to trust that someone really knows what they mean when they say that they want to end it all.

Pam

Pam in Virginia said...

Hi, Chris:

Thank you for moving Inge's comment; I just found that you did that.

I have indeed spared a sympathetic thought for the poor editor.

Thank you for clarifying the term "brain pain"; I believe that your definition came out of Gray's Anatomy?

We grow some of the red and green mustard, also. I can only cook with a small bit of it, let alone eat it raw! I can certainly see why it would help with sinus troubles and I wonder if the sulphur content might not be part of the curative effect? I think that is partly what makes garlic so effective. Our plain green mustard is completely mild; I like that better.

That was a very clever plan, sticking berry prunings about here and there. Do you think that some of the success was because of the extra-wet winter that you had?

Do you use the same form for all of your concrete steps, with perhaps a bit of modification where they make a turn? The booze cabinet is turning out superbly; in fact, you may have to be careful because visitors may admire the piece of furniture itself so much that they may be curious to see if it is finished as nicely inside, and when they peek in they will be mighty surprised!

What a beautiful, beautiful plum tree - and so much green grass! There are already so many lovely flowers.

Pam

Yahoo2 said...

I just had a look at the forecast, looks like you are penciled in for 50-100mm on friday, its going to be damp. only place wetter will be Erriba in Tassie. if I was living there I would be patching my rubber dingy and praying it misses. I bagged a mighty 1.4mm as it went over here,I'm a mere 21 inches behind you now. Clothes will take an extra 1.7 seconds to dry on the line ;) 24C and windy, Barley grass went from green to white yesterday like it has been frosted, landscape has gone from looking lush to dry overnight.
re poly pipe. Uncovered pipe on the ground is OK provided the water is not static and under pressure, heat buildup will burst it. I cut a small trench with a grader and lay pvc and mound it slightly over the top (sleeve it with bore casing where it is driven over) good for a trouble free 50 years if done properly. I have had termites damage high pressure poly beyond repair in 3 years in mallee scrub on sandy soil. I would guess your poly was buried during a warm afternoon and it shrunk as it cooled, the tension probably has pulled the pipe out of a fitting. It is probably worth fixing, if you can locate a couple of joins where the taps are plumbed in you can isolate the pipe into sections and narrow down the leaking piece to a short section, from there you can create a wet patch and find the leak or replace that whole section. My shovel allergy gets worse as I get older, now-days I use two joiners on my heritage poly lines and a front end loader or backhoe. It is easier to hit the pipe with the bucket and replace it than faf about all day with a shovel.

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Damo,

Mate, I totally hear you about the Australia drawl making it hard to be understood in Laos. I used to take maps for the occasional trip by taxi and that seemed to help. I recall reading that you had a similar experience with the maps. Language is hard enough to understand without the added complication of tones as well. Are you picking up much of the language through constant use? I reckon that is a good way to learn a language.

Yeah, I heard about the money - they quoted US$100m on the radio here put towards removing unexploded ordinance in return for US bodies. I recall that from my time in Laos and Cambodia including the land mine issue and it is not good for anyone. There is also a bit of geo-political machinations going on in the background relating to China...

On Triple J they mentioned that Turnbull was over there too. That guy has 99 problems most of which appear to have been brought onto himself. I would personally stop any and all political donations and remove the lobbyists - all of them. A labour MP fell on his sword yesterday too for apparently taking bribes. He was quite well spoken so I was mildly surprised at the allegations.

Thanks for the suggestions too! :-)!

Cheers

Chris

margfh said...

Hi Lew,

I'll let you know as I get farther along in the book. So far I've just read the first few chapters. I'm familiar with the theme, of course, but always appreciate how JMG backs up his opinions with historical facts. I'm afraid my education in that area was quite lacking but them I may not have been paying attention. As the saying goes, "Education is wasted on the young." - well maybe some young people.

Margaret

orchidwallis said...

hello again

Goodness me, tonal languages, what a nightmare! I then realised that we use some tone. I can say 'really' or 'did you' on a rising inflection implying my disbelief, facial expression would apply as well. Of course that is why one can so frequently misunderstand the written word.

I loved Pam's suggestion that people might open a door of your cupboard to see if the finish was as good inside. I have a mahogany cupboard which is beautifully carved on the inside of the doors.

Another gorgeous day here. All my tomatoes have blight, but the local newspaper mentioned that it had been seriously around on the Island this year.

@ Pam

I agree about the problems associated with euthanasia but feel that we have gone too far with the anti view. It does go on covertly in hospitals etc.

Yes, travelling does teach one that the grass is not necessarily greener elsewhere.

Inge

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Lewis,

That is fascinating. I guess such resistance in the population will develop sooner or later. It seems a bit strange for a pathogen of any sort to kill its host. That was mentioned in the 1918 flu epidemic too in that the virus came to an abrupt halt as it was a victim of its own success. I also wonder too whether the immunity was developed in some Northern Europeans because of the extreme cold which would have killed off many of the rat hosts and their fleas and so the spread of the plague would have been more like a slow and continual wave rather than a frontal, ongoing and prolonged assault? Dunno. The other interesting thing that I noted in the map which showed the progress of the plague across the European continent was that Poland seemed to have been mostly avoided by the spread of the plague for some unknown reason. Dunno why.

Fascinating. There will be repercussions from that fall out for sure. We have just gone through a similar thing down here with many institutes and colleges closing. Many of those institutions received their funding fully upfront via the government, whilst the students took on the loans. Many students were apparently provided incentive things and stuff such as iPads etc. in order to sign on. With the failure of those institutions, the students still have to carry the debt which is held by the government. I am watching that one for an explosion (maybe). It is very nice that the debts are forgiven if the course is not completed in your part of the world. I heard some very sad and also other very angry people talking about this issue recently.

Of course, education equals a job is an unfortunate meme that is sold to people. I'm uncertain how long that meme will hold up. The technical term for that is perhaps: Strawberry. In such a situation you dangle a cheap thing in front of a crew so as to get them used to enjoying the perquisites of the cheap thing and then you raise the price over time. Not too much, and not too fast. Like the three little bears it has to be just right! I will point out that at one stage in this country's history (about 1974) University courses were made free for those that could achieve the entry criteria. By 1989 when I started, I encountered the first year of fees (and thus debt). I was a strawberry. Incidentally, and not to worry you, but cheap products in large volumes with questionable quality appear to me to be a similar strategy. I tend not to worry about that sort of stuff as I am too busy trying to pick the wheat from the chaff.

I totally agree with you. If the competition is tight for jobs you have to do whatever your opposition doesn't want to do. That does not make for pleasant listening though. Your strategy was very Sun Tzu by the way. ;-)!

A place with a name like: Rum Runners, has to be good! I quite enjoy the spectacle of that sort of over the top fit out - as long as the food is good. That place sounds like a place I have enjoyed on many occasions on the Hobart (in Tasmania) water front called the Drunken Admiral. All good fun! Yes, neither you nor I have the stamina for fried food that we once enjoyed when we were younger. I start to notice when the oil is less than fresh too. Oh, the standards we have become accustomed too! I hope your guts eventually settled down?

cont...

Cherokee Organics said...

Wow, do they have three thrift shops for that group? The visiting hospice nurses do a great job. They do books down here too in op shops, and I am wondering what you managed to score? I picked up a copy of Michael Lewis (him of The Big Short) Liar's Poker recently for $3. How good is that? Nice to look at, has no price and makes a building become a home! :-)!

Haha! That is hysterical! Very amusing. Of course cleaning the bog hopefully doesn't mean dumping (excuse the pun!) high quality plastic poly pipe and fittings deep in the soil. Still, I'm very happy to now have water again in that initial area again at least. It is sometimes not until something doesn't work that you realise just how much you use the thing...

Ha! Again, you nailed that one. Did you write them a letter saying how much more convenient the Tung Oil would be if it had epoxy resin in it? I'm just wondering how repairable this stuff will be in the distant future. Probably not very is the answer...

Mate, I am very worried here. Apparently from about 3am to about 3pm, one months rain will fall here tomorrow. I put a link to an image of the rainfall map and it is one bad business... I'm hoping that my recent excavations don't wash down the hill - although both yourself and Inge have wisely warned me in advance of the dangers of this very occurrence!

Oh, here is the rainfall forecast. I am located at just above the "t" in the name of the town of Ballarat which you can see on the map. Incidentally Ballarat as you well know is pronounced Bal-a-rat. Here goes: Rainfall forecast 2016 September 09

I shall provide a full report tomorrow (hopefully if we aren't washed down the hill). If you hear nothing then things are not good!

Cheers

Chris

PS: You did your trip into town a day early! What's going on?

Pam in Virginia said...

@ Damo:

I so much enjoyed hearing from the "horse's mouth" the preparations for Mr. Obama's visit. One never gets the neat details like that in the MM. And good that money has been offered to help clean things up.

Pam

Angus Wallace said...

Hi Chris,

Yup -- I think 'English' is a fair characterisation of the South Australian accent. 'dance' rhymes with 'barn' for me ;-)

ps. I have issues with some wines too -- i get itchy when I've drunk some (as little as 1 glass sometimes) -- I'm pretty sure it's the additives (though it's partly the alcohol too)

Cheers, Angus

Pam in Virginia said...

@ Lew:

I was rather shocked that ITT was closing down. It's been around most of my life and, my goodness, we must have hundreds of their commercials on the old VHS tapes that we recorded so many movies and TV shows on. I use to enjoy pondering all of the variety of careers that they would offer. I was thinking last night about when we first got (dial-up) the internet 15 or 16 years ago, as at the moment my husband and I are sharing one modem until his new one arrives in the mail - he takes it to work during the day and I get it the rest of the time (are we being cheap or what, Chris?!). Remember how you had to take turns (that is, if there were other people in the house) using the internet, just like the landline phone? One PC, one connection.

Fish and chips - probably one of the world's most delightful meals!

I meant to comment to you how very nice I think you are to be putting so much work into leaving your present home even better than you found it.

Went to the dentist yesterday - the tooth can't be saved and has to come out. An implant was suggested, but I have declined as it is far enough back (a molar) that I can manage just fine without it. Like you, I am not going to add several more thousands of dollars worth of work. Let this be a lesson to you people out there - TAKE CARE OF YOUR TEETH - they don't grow back . . . except for my grandfather, who had a second set of wisdom teeth come in under the first . . .

Pam

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Pam,

Thank you for sending nice thoughts to the long suffering editor. The editor who wishes to remain anonymous here on the blog for her own reasons, has entered the flu stage of the cold about two days ago so she is not feeling so good tonight, but hopefully should be feeling better tomorrow. A sterling example of non-whingey sickness has been set too by her... Honestly, I'm feeling the pressure for future sick performances! :-)!

I have never seen that particular show, but I have heard that it is very entertaining. No doubts that I picked up that term third hand. Although I would like to say that they stole my style? Hehe!

Thanks for explaining that about your green mustard. The guy that I got the original plant from clearly bred it for heat. The red/green mustard is very tasty too. Thanks for mentioning that about the sulphur compounds as I don't know whether it is suggestibility or not, but I can almost taste that in the mustard. I appreciate the technical tip!

Possibly so. I haven't tried to repeat the experiment, so I'll see how it goes. A few years ago a mate gave me a whole lot of elderberry cuttings and they did a similar thing and about 80% of them took. But I just can't recall whether it was due to a wet winter or not. My propagation books mention that that method is acceptable, but as usual they cover so much ground that they fail to discuss the conditions required to ensure that propagation succeeds. They are all at best an introduction, but then most of this stuff is. Hopefully over the weekend, I will relocate most of my blackberries to the new enclosure, but much depends on tomorrow as one month’s worth of rainfall is apparently meant to fall here... I linked a rainfall map to Lewis’s comment…

No, the formwork is exactly the same as I have always used. I'll put a photo in the next blog so you can see what it looks like. It incorporates an angle to the rear of the formwork so that I can turn the formwork in any direction I choose. Although I do try to provide a smooth change of direction and try to produce an organic and natural shape.

Do you get visitors who start poking through your cupboards in the kitchen? A mate of mine does that and it always really annoys me, as he well knows. I always have to end up feeding him to stop him rifling through the cupboards. And another friend says my kitchen cupboards scare them because they don't know what most of the things in there are (they are clearly an adherent of the ding ding microwave cook school)!

Thank you. The rain and the heat may turn this place into a jungle before too long! The bees are enjoying the flowers too and they were everywhere today.

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Steve,

Mate, you made me laugh! It's going to be damp is one massive understatement. A close up of the rainfall forecast has left me feeling mildly nervous. I posted a picture just in case you wanted to see just how big this storm is meant to be: Rainfall forecast 2016 September 09. I’m located just a bit above the letter “t” in Ballarat.

Sorry to hear that it is so dry further north. It is an early heat this year. Even Melbourne made it to 23'C today whilst up in the north west over the Kimberly (Fitzroy Crossing) it is forecast to reach nearly 40'C over the next few days. You may be in for a wet summer though? Dunno. Spring can be dry further north than here.

PS: At some point either in the wee hours of the morning, or later tomorrow I am going to get drenched fixing something that has gone wrong.

Thanks for the tip, I wouldn't have thought of that. I am installing them behind rock walls so they are partially shaded during the day and that may help a bit. Out of curiosity what sort of PVC pipe do you use? I use the 3/4 inch black and green line stuff which is rated to... 800kPa (or 116psi). I just went out in the dark to check. Oh for a trencher or a backhoe! I put the 3/4 inch pipe in 50mm PVC pipe in a trench in the ground where it is walked or driven over. A wise precaution! I found a very damp patch of soil near a connector, but that is indicative and not conclusive of a leak as it has been a wet winter here. I am absolutely stuffed if I know what went wrong as I did the thing properly (or so I thought) the first time around.

Termites are a nightmare, and I know a guy that had termites get into his off grid battery room and from there into the inverter, no doubt attracted by the vibrations and/or sound being emitted by the device! Needless to say the device required repairs.

Thanks for the excellent suggestion and it was indeed installed on a hot day. The clay here swells and contracts with the available soil moisture. The land here shifts and I can see that over time, in fact I have some photos of that for the next blog (a raised garden bed sank). And yes, replacing can be the more expedient solution in the long run. I will do exactly as you suggest, although I have replaced the initial run of pipes so far. I have noticed a small bit of vibration on the outlet side of the pipe from the pump and am wondering whether I should worry about it or not. I don't know, the other pumps do not do this and I guess sooner or later the minor vibration will cause a failure. What do you reckon about that?

Cheers

Chris

orchidwallis said...

hello again

My condolences to the editor and I hope that she soon feels better. I remember having flu when I was still looking after my husband and he was already bedridden. I would wake and spend time contemplating how I was going to get out of bed. My husband said 'don't do anything that you don't have to do' and I replied 'Don't worry, I am only doing survival stuff for us both'. Son was not living on the Island at that time.

Inge

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Inge,

Thanks for the info on the pigs as I'm learning quite a lot. They really are lovely creatures. Did you get any bacon, hocks or sausages from the last lot of processing?

Yeah, I've seen and tasted roasted beetroot, but I generally prefer it pickled. Plus I consume the leaves in salads.

I have been wondering for quite a while now whether the structure of the written English language is actually a very different beast from what is commonly spoken. So much of our spoken language does rely on facial and other expressions and also as you say the emphasis can change depending on how the words are delivered. The written language tends to be quite flat in contrast, but then we can chuck in the word "feral" every now and then to provide a bit of extra emphasis? It is a complex matter.

Speaking of feral. Apparently one month's rain will fall here tomorrow, so I'm crossing my fingers and hoping that the excavations stay right where they are. I'm honestly not entirely convinced that they will be there tomorrow night, but fingers crossed!

A lot of the older furniture is beautifully constructed with great care and attention to detail. The inside of the cabinet is quite well finished and we have oiled inside it as well. I just worry about the repairability aspect now that they have included epoxy in the oil. I didn’t realise that when I bought the tin.

Oh yeah, for sure. Tomatoes are thirsty crops, but there can be a thing such as too much water for a tomato crop and no doubts your blight would be a direct result of that. Do you often get blights in some crops or is this a rare occurrence?

Hi Pam and Inge,

I have made that particular decision about two decades ago about another human. I thought you may be interested to know that I have had a very long time to consider the implications of that particular decision. This may make for unpleasant hearing and it is in no way a criticism of anyone, but I do feel that people are concerned about that particular decision - and it is one hot button topic, or what! - because they wish to delay the inevitable situation where they are the next in line to face what that particular person is going through, thus the sense of delay. I have often heard people commenting to me that they realised after their parents died that they were next in line. On the other hand I have to accommodate myself to issues relating to abandonment and death from a young age and I sort of came to accept that death is part of life. That doesn't remove fear, but it does give a person a sense of inevitability. Dunno.

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Angus,

Thanks for that. It was pretty funny! I heard that example from a song by Courtney Barnett - Pickles from the Jar (from memory). Fun stuff.

Absolutely, the alcohol is a mild poison too, but the sulphur really gives me a hayfever reaction. The stuff is in all sorts of brews too.

I'll check out your blog too!

Cheers

Chris

LewisLucanBooks said...

@ Damo - The Clinton's and the Gore's did a campaign swing through our little town, years ago. I had planned a, rare for me, vacation months before we got word. The Secret Service was not amused when I told them they'd have to reschedule so I could participate in the event. :-). I had taken the train, on vacation, and left my truck in a supposed ok parking area. They changed their minds. So, when I got back, it had been broken into, hot wired and towed. Cost me a few bucks. :-(.

Yo, Chris - Fingers crossed your rainfall won't be too bad. Looks like you're right on the border between "heavy" and "deluge".

Maybe Poland wasn't sparred the plague. Maybe there was just no one left to report that it had ripped through?

Yeah, Visiting Nurses has one thrift store in Centralia, and the two (one new) in Chehalis. The two Chehalis stores equal the footage of the one Centralia store. I wonder if they'll close down the older one in Chehalis? Haven't heard anything. Yeah, I got some pretty good books. An enormous hardback one of Georgia O'Keeffe paintings ($1.39) and a nice large paperback one of Winslow Homer paintings and drawings. (.69). Hardback collected poetry of Emily Dickinson (1.00) and something called "From Hardtack to Home Fries: An Uncommon History of American Cooks and Meals" by Haber. Don't know anything about it but at $1.19 .... hardback.

Yeah, I was pretty lavish with the gasoline, this week. Two trips to town. No particular reason other than I had a lot of stops and wanted to break it up, a bit. LOL. Beau is so spoiled. I stopped the one place to pick up a 55 pound bag of his usual dog food ... and even though that place has an aisle of dog biscuits ... both sides, they don't carry the healthy brand I get for him. So, that meant another stop at another feed store.

I've also been experimenting with different brands of tea ... mostly due to cost. My preferred Stash brand has not been put on sale in quit awhile. So, I've been trying this and that. I usually alternate between a good green and a black. It's been pretty disappointing. Then I discovered Taylor"s of Harrogate, Yorkshire Tea. Oh, my. Real "builder's tea." I drink it black and it's so thick I can almost stand a spoon up in it :-). Lovely. And, on sale for only $3 per 100 bags. The Stash Green was also on sale for $3 ... but only 20 bags per box. That I save for "special." My tea plant is blooming, again. Now I know that it will produce seed, I've been trying a big of hand pollinating. Cont.

SLClaire said...

Hi Chris,

Mustard greens have allyl isothiocyanate in them (this info courtesy of https://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/duke_energy/Brassica_juncea.html). The "thio" in the name is sulfur. This compound seems to be the source of the brain pain as it is described as an irritant and a rubefacient. Horseradish has the same compound so that's why the brain pain feels the same for mustard and horseradish.

To make grated horseradish root, you begin with a fresh root. The saying is not to harvest it in a month that doesn't have the letter "r" in the name, but that only works in the Northern Hemisphere ;). What it really means is harvest when it's cool; fall through spring. We buy a fresh root at the festival. It's wrapped in plastic and I suspect was harvested weeks before the festival and refrigerated, the plastic serving to hold in its moisture. The easiest way to grate it is using a food processor, but bring the food processor outside and stand upwind of it while you're grinding it. It gives off irritating gases. You then add vinegar to the ground root to preserve it. How soon you add the vinegar determines how hot the horseradish will be. Wait at least three minutes after grinding to get maximum heat and add as much as is needed for the consistency of sauce you want.

I haven't used the leaves (we have some in our yard from the previous owners) but since you mentioned them, I'll try them. I had heard they could be used as greens.

The pain you get from chili peppers is quite different; the compound is called capsaicin and it has no sulfur in it at all. Instead it is an amide, meaning it has as part of its structure a nitrogen atom bonded to a carbon that has a doubly-bonded oxygen atom on it. Peppers are the only plant that produce it. Here's a chemistry-heavy website with the info: http://www.chemistryviews.org/details/ezine/6108461/The_Biochemistry_of_Peppers.html

What the mustards and the peppers have in common is that their irritating compounds have been made into weapons: mustard gas and the capsaicin-based pepper sprays. And thus ends today's chemistry lesson.

Lew: I've seen the banana slugs out west. They deserve their own festival! Mike says someone is missing out on money: pet stores should be marketing banana slugs as pets to preteen boys. He'd have gotten one. ;)

Both Mike and I smirked at the news of ITT's shutdown. I'd had a bit of interaction with the local campus back in the 1990s, when I gave a couple of guest talks on sustainability to a class. At the front of the classroom a TV set scrolled campuswide news during the whole class, which seemed to me a major distraction, but may have already been common in post-secondary class settings. The instructor was a creep. He was too chatty and among other things told me that he had the solution to overpopulation: mandatory euthanasia (murder would have been the more appropriate word) of everyone over forty. Both he and I were that age at the time. I thought to myself, but didn't say, that he wasn't making his case well since he didn't seem eager to volunteer for it. I suppose ITT had some good instructors too, but he soured me on the place, hence the smirk.

Chris, please give my get-well-soon wishes to the editor, and I hope you weather the storm!

Claire

LewisLucanBooks said...

Cont. Big hoopla over Apple's new I what's it, thingy. Apparently, there is no longer a port that you can plug in just any old pair of ear phones. Nope. Now you've got to spend an extra $159 to buy Apple's wireless earphones. Or expensive work arounds. And, if you use the work arounds, you can't listen and charge at the same time ... Your alternatives: dongles (? sounds slightly "dirty") wireless or lightening tax (?).

Apple's reasoning / defense? "Effortless and magical listening experience." "The courage to move on, do something new that betters all of us." Gee, I feel so ... uplifted. And, I don't and won't even have one of the darn things :-). One apoplectic article "Apple Just Demonstrated Why People Hate the Tech Industry," stated that "Apple killed a technology that's worked fine for decades and left you with solutions that are costlier or more complex and work no better at the core function." Well, most of us have figured that out but it's nice to know the technorati are finally catching up with the plot. The comments were scathing.

Speaking of comments, I've noticed our NPR (National Public Radio) news website had discontinued comments. "We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us everyday on Facebook, Twitter, email and many other platforms." Of course, NPR has (to me) become less and less relevant. An article from yesterday? (Drum roll and cue up ominous music...) "Tiki Bars: Harmless Fun or Exploitation?" When I walked into our 12 Step Club, yesterday, I asked my friend Scott (who was waiting counter) if a.) he provided trigger warnings and b.) was this a safe space. Sadly, he got my joke.

Accents: I watch a lot of British series that I get from the library. It's pretty common for an actor to cock their head and say something like Canadian ... American ... Australian. They've clearly caught the accent. Then they have one of two reactions. It's either "Isn't that interesting!" or "We'll just look down our nose and put you in this little box, over here." Which is really shorthand and tells you a lot about the character of the .... character.

I was going to say some things about Greer's book, "Dark Age America." i reread the first chapter, last night. Gosh, there's so much in there. One thing I remember is that civilizations on the way up, all look pretty different. Civilizations on the way down, all look (and act) pretty much the same. So, with a broad brush, you can make some ... not predictions, so much, as suppositions. I suppose if you've seen one mud hut, you've seen them all .... Lew

W. B. Jorgenson said...

Hi Chris,

If you can tell a Canadian accent from an American, you're better than most Canadians... I can as well but my ear is well trained for it these days. And no need to apologize to me about it, I've enjoyed convincing people my Australian friends are actually from New Zealand!

We do have some good places for Indian food around here. I'm rather fond of a place downtown run by immigrants from India. They tried to make their family's traditional cuisine but it wouldn't sell, so they made it match what did, while keeping all the same flavors from their own region. Now that they're established, they're making regional dishes again. If I had more money I think i'd be going there quite a lot, it's one of the best restaurants I know of.

Well, having fresh flowers growing everywhere sounds really nice. I sometimes wonder why people don't grow more, but I guess other people find aesthetics less important than I do.

orchidwallis said...

Hello again

Yes I have plenty of pork in various forms; annoying actually because I have no freezer space left.

End of life is indeed a difficult subject. Dying worries me not at all, only the manner of it. I am the oldest member of my extended family.

@ Pam
I was fascinated to hear of your grandfather's extra lot of wisdom teeth. I have a great niece who produced a number of sets of her front teeth. How wonderfully original we all are.

@ Lew
I am glad to hear that there is some outside wild area near your future habitation, an aid to sanity.

Inge

Hazel Marchant said...

Hi Chris

I thought that you (and anyone else who suffers from the sulphites in wine) might like to know that you can get a product called Pure Wine at bottle shops. It apparently binds to the preservatives, and neutralises them. My son gets migraines from sulphites, and he swears by the stuff.

My sympathy to the editor - half of Canberra seems to have the flu, and it's nasty.

Cheers

Hazel

Damo said...

@Pam and Lew
Yes, the presidential motorcade was all a bit surreal in sleepy Luang Prabang. I can't decide if it is all bread and circuses or another example of the disconnect between modern leaders and their populations?

Isn't the new iPhone an amazing development? I mean, all they needed to do was place directional microphones, a microchip, lithium battery, DAC, amplifier and transceiver into a small earpiece (twice actually, one for each ear), plus a dedicated wireless chip in the phone along with thousands of man-hours of software development to give us.....not much really. Earbuds that only work for 5 hours before requiring a recharge, won't work on any other device on the planet and delivers lower sound quality than the old-school headphone jack*.

It amazes me that some people hand-on-heart still call this sort of thing progress. And the real kicker is that every phone for the past 10 years already supported wireless headphones via the Bluetooth protocol.

Bemusedly, Damo

*Wireless headphones (including the new apple product) transport audio via Bluetooth. This is a lossy technique which compresses the audio before sending to save power. As a result, Bluetooth audio sounds worse than anything using a cable. This is fine for certain use cases, but anyone who appreciates their music does not use wireless headphones.

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Lewis,

Thanks very much for crossing your fingers. That must have done the trick because the rain was persistent and yet very gentle - all day long (about an inch and a half). I can't really ask for more than that. The excavations have survived intact, but I must confess that I was planning to extend them tomorrow, but it is a little bit wet and muddy, so I'll do something else instead.

The interesting thing is that I finally had a vision for the new terraced area. We'd been more or less constructing the terrace for a while now, but the plans had never felt quite right. The design has since coalesced over the past day or so. It is really hard to know what to do in places like these ahead of time and sometimes you just have to forge ahead and hope for inspiration which usually strikes sooner or later (hopefully sooner rather than later).

Oh, that third way Poland black plague theory is possibly true. I recall seeing an old Nosferatu film when I was a young kid and that involved a goodly quantity of rats fleeing a docked ship into the unsuspecting port. The character of Nosferatu seemed to act as if that incident agreed with his sensibilities. It was quite a memorable scene. The rats and I are not on friendly terms here and I suspect that they are my equal (and perhaps even exceed my meagre talents in that regard) when it comes to cunning...

Yeah maybe, that was more or less what I was wondering. Most of those stores are staffed by volunteers which is nice, but down in Melbourne they have a store called "Savers" which provides (paid I believe) experience for disadvantaged people. A cafe I used to frequent in Melbourne to enjoy a good lunch was at the CERES environmental park which used to employ a colourful collection of characters. The cafe was in a shaded pavilion which sort of had the ambience of a large tropical open sided hut. The winters were cold and the summers were hot, but it was easy to get a seat out of the weather (and the staff were out of the weather although subjected to the ambient air temperature in the shade). The cafe provided organically grown (on site) cooked produce and the food was superb and it was surrounded by gardens. I used to eat there regularly but they constructed a fancy new building and the new cafe looks more impressive I guess, but it is located next to the car park of all things. The old cafe was closed down. Some of the staff went to work in the new fancy cafe, but I often wonder what happened to the staff that did not transition across. I miss that place.

Hardtack sounds very unappealing. Is that another name for Ships Biscuits? In the old days biscuits used to be manufactured not far from the Port Melbourne wharf.

cont...

Cherokee Organics said...

Oh my goodness! One whole aisle of dog biscuits is beyond my imagination - unless it was a very small aisle. But it is good to hear that Beau is spoiled rotten. That is a dogs life for you! No stress, one trip, two trips, it is all good. I have not been far off the mountain for about a week. Someone asked me recently if I was enjoying it up there? And I am!

We don't have a huge variety of tea down here, but I generally stick to the Twinning’s variety. Hey, I tried a lemon and ginger herbal tea variety which is quite good as it has a bit of zing to it. I tend to pick up the ground coffee when it goes on sale too. There is so little waste with that stuff and the worms get all of the used grounds anyway. I have read disturbing accounts of the sheer volume of waste ending up in landfill from pod coffee machines. For a start I suspect that pod coffee is a form of instant coffee rather than a proper espresso, and that is a true horror, but the plastic waste is not good either...

Green and black teas are good, and I enjoyed your description of black tea! Very funny. I'll be interested to hear how your pollination of the tea camellia goes? I may add to my small collection of them here given they over wintered well - despite the snowfall. Camellia seeds are very large things almost like a chestnut from what I've seen. The coffee is well and truly dead.

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Claire,

Thank you for researching and confirming that it is a sulphur compound which causes the brain pan. You may be interested to know that horseradish is also of the mustard (Brassica) family so no wonder it has the same sulphur compound.

What a fascinating process with grinding the horseradish and you have inspired me to give it a go next late autumn when the plants start to become deciduous. I may even divide and spread the tubers too at that time. The three minute rule sounds pretty good to me too! :-)! And thanks also for the warning about the off gassing. Onions are pretty lethal in a kitchen as well!

I'll be very interested to hear what you have to say about the leaves. They are tasty but being a summer and heat hardy leaf, they are quite thick which doesn't always work the best in salads. The chickens enjoy the fresh greens over summer though.

Yes, it is amazing how we as a species seem to be able to consistently misuse our technology. Thanks for the chemistry lesson, I knew about capsicum, but never realised that about the mustard gas.

You may be happy to know that the long suffering editor is finally feeling more sprightly today. It has been a massive flu.

Best wishes for your fall crops.

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi W.B,

Thanks, the difference is quite distinctive to my ear, plus the general mannerisms are different too between Canadians and Americans. That is funny too. Yes, there has long been a good natured ribbing between Australians and New Zealanders. If you ever want to really stir them up, ask them if NZ is a state of Australia - it almost became one in the now distant past. New Zealand deals it back to us too! If you have ever watched: Flight of the Chonchords then you will know what I mean. It is a good show too and they are good musicians.

Starting any small business from scratch is hard and they were wise to take that approach.

Hey, speaking of starting up, good luck and best wishes for your meet up!

There is that, but largely, it comes down to land prices. They are so high that the land has to pay its way and thus the popularity of industrial mono culture agriculture. I believe that land is not there to make you money, it is there to save you money. I read that quote once and it resonated with me. You may have to dwell upon the concept for a while.

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Inge,

Ha! I am enjoying your tails (sic!) of over supply of pork. Well, there is always salted pork when ones refrigerator is full. Plus I don't actually know how they cured the old ham hocks. I used to use those as a basis for a pea and ham soup which is making my mouth water in memory. Yum!

It is a difficult subject and I tried to walk a gentle line on that subject. To my mind it is over heated given that it happens to all of us. I hear you.

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Hazel,

Thanks for that suggestion and I'll check it out. I feel for your son and the stuff gives me headaches too. I tend to avoid the issue altogether though. Those compounds are in a lot of beers and ciders too.

You may be happy to hear that the editor is recovering strongly today. I haven't heard anything about the spread of this flu and appreciate your view on the street. I often read the Canberra Times when I've used up my 30 reads of articles on The Age! ;-)!

Cheers

Chris

orchidwallis said...

@ Lew Oh yes, Yorkshire tea is great.

Inge

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Lewis,

I have a solution for that particular lack of port problem. Don't buy the thing in the first place. It seems to work for me, although with something like an 85% to 90% penetration into the market down here for smart phones, I am very much in the minority. Still, I actually enjoy reading maps and listening to the radio, although it is considered quaint and mildly quirky. The thing I worry about is being locked out of some services as they provide them as “app only” services… I wonder about that.

Well, I have read in the business section reports that perhaps we have passed Peak Apple, and they also unflatteringly described Apple as a hardware company rather than a software company. All things peak and decline and that is life. I can't honestly see what more phones could possibly do that people actually want them to do anyway. Apparently voice calls are uncool these days, so I am even more old fashioned than previously...

My gut feeling is that the moderating process for those NPR websites has become too problematic, dysfunctional, and thus expensive. Certainly I have seen websites shut down comments on hot button articles. I rather suspect that paid shills are being paid to, well, shill. I hear them on the radio too, although I'd so like to be wrong, there is something about them and they lack a certain sort of genuineness and other times they are a bit too polished. Look, as I wrote, I'd really like to be wrong, but my gut feeling tells me otherwise.

Sorry mate, your Tiki Bar jokes were lost on me... I don't actually know what a Tiki Bar is, which probably doesn't help. I'll try and track down the original article (if there still is one? Maybe?).

Well, we're pretty down to Earth down here and the whole original colonisation enterprise by the English was really a pressure relief valve for their lower classes forced into wage slavery by the processes of the Industrial revolution and also the prison population. Some here may feel superior, but it is hard to get uppity when ones beginnings are so far down in the muck! Hehe!

Cheers

Chris

Pam in Virginia said...

Chris:

Poor Editor, you guys have really been hit hard. I tried to think of a name for a lady flu that would be fun like "man flu", but it was beyond me. Something that implies patience and stoicism.

So far, hopefully you are avoiding Noah's Flood, it sounds like. I hope that continues.

I don't believe that I've ever had anyone look in my cupboards unless they asked first. Friends are allowed to just go in and get what they want; it saves me the trouble of asking what they want and then having to serve it, and makes them feel at home - I hope.

I will be interested to see your concrete form and the sunken garden bed. The way your land is always shifting and swelling and moving gives it the resemblance to a living, breathing entity. Perhaps it was in Star Trek?

I am afraid that I just can't speak from a knowledgeable position about human death; perhaps I am of modern construct in that area? The loved one's death beds that I have been at have always been animals, quite a lot of them, though, as they almost all died at home. I think that the "next in line" thing is a lot of hooey, as when it is your time to go, you go, unless you are a prince, in which case, you may well be next in line for the throne. I have remembered that my mother (not sure about my dad) has a "do not resuscitate" clause in her living will, which I can certainly honor. She also wishes to be buried in her blue jeans, though she may have changed that to "cremated" to save money.

Pam

orchidwallis said...

Hello again

I have mentioned before that son's attempts at ham fail due to our hefty humidity. He does make bacon but it tastes better if not over salted, hence there is a keeping problem if it isn't frozen. I do make split pea soup (yellow split peas) and usually put belly pork in it, yum, yum.

Inge

Pam in Virginia said...

@ Inge:

All of our tomatoes have blight, too. Steve at "Virid Views" (right sidebar) said the same.

Pam

Pam in Virginia said...

@ Claire:

Thanks so much for the sulphur and capsaicin info, and for the horseradish processing recipe. We grow horseradish, but I haven't fooled with it in a while as it is a messy business! And it seemed to get all grey and mucky, but I wasn't adding vinegar to it . . .

Pam

LewisLucanBooks said...

Yo, Chris - I'm glad the rain didn't wash you away. Keep an eye on the alignment of your posts. Sometimes, land slippage happens months later. Takes awhile for the water to percolate down to the clay layer. Hmmm. A terrace vision. Now I'm going to tease you. Was there a clap of thunder? A burning bush? :-). But, I know what you mean. Sometimes you have to get really into a project before you see a very cool ... final form. It dawned on me the other day that reversing two bookshelves that are back to back would work better than the current configuration. LOL. But now they've got to be unladed and reversed.

I knew a Canadian family when I was in high school. I can spot the accent in some words. The one that comes to mind is "about". The American pronounce it (at least in this part of America) "Ab-out". Most Canadians pronounce it "A-boot." There's a couple of other "tells" that don't come to mind, right now.

Yup. Hardtack and ship's biscuits seem to be the same thing. Speaking of biscuits, no, the dog biscuit aisle (both sides) was very long. Odd that they didn't carry the ONE brand that I know is healthy for Beau. I just don't know about the other brands.

I'm trying to figure out a comparison size for the tea seeds. Hmmm. Twice the size of a pea? About the size of my little fingernail? About the size of an American dime, but that might not translate very well. I don't really care for the Twinning's Earl Gray. The Stash brand had Bergamot in it, which I thought was nice, but the Twinning's has a citrus flavor ... lemon, that I don't care for. It tastes .... like an artificial flavor.

Tiki Bars had a South Seas or Hawaiian theme. Trader Vic's used to be a large chain of them. I think they became popular for a few reasons. GI's coming back from the Pacific ... the musical and film "South Pacific." Hawaii as a vacation destination as air travel became less expensive and more popular. Sure, they were kind of cheesy, but, looking back had a certain charm. And, I guess because of nostalgia, they're making a bit of a come back. Much to the chagrin of the Social Justice Warriors. Cont.

LewisLucanBooks said...

Cont. Speaking of which, there was a good link on the ADR to Permaculture News. An article on "entryism". The highjacking of groups by people, or other groups with an agenda ... This article, along with the post that JMG did a couple of weeks ago about "piggybacking", etc.. Well. I wish I had known all this back in the late 60s when I sat through HOURS of meetings. I always knew there was something ... off. Something, wrong, but I could never put my finger on what it was.

You are right. Voice calls seem to have fallen into the uncool range. And, sometimes it seems as if e-mail is not far behind. It's all texting, now. Or, sometimes seems to be. Well, as far as being locked out of services ... you just have to ask yourself if you REALLY need whatever the Ap service is? Recently, I've run across a few commercial sites that demand my e-mail address before entry. Mmmmm. No. Or, want my phone number. Also, no. Haven't found any I can't live without, or, that don't have a competitor who's not so ... invasive.

I just have a simple flip phone. Pay as I go. I do have this beasty of a Mac on my desk, but I figure it's going to bite the dust, sooner or later. I'll probably get a Mac laptop to replace it. Mostly because I'm familiar with how they work and the security seems slightly better. Or I should say, they have a small enough market share that some hackers can't be bothered :-).

I picked quit a few Italian prunes, yesterday. I should finish that, this afternoon. Can or freeze? Hmmmm? Lew

Yahoo2 said...

roast beetroot. yum. i trim the tops leaving 5mm of stem, dont cut or peel or they will bleed badly, wash and roast covered (foil or pan lid). I tend to chuck them in the fridge then peel and use them cold. The sweetness is a Good combination with tart and oily things in salads etc.

re pipe vibration. we use accumulators to stop water hammer but only on windmills and piston pumps, unless it is pulsing beyond the pipes rating it should be fine. I use class12 (1200kpa) to class 16 PVC the only trick is dont over glue the female end and get a ring of glue inside the pipe and twist and hold till it grips or it will pop back out or crack the join while its soft, cold mornings are the worst. Oh and every damn insect will crawl in the lengths of pipe if it is left laid out on the ground overnight.
I see Wood End had 33mm, that's not excessive.
Chris, it is not actually dry here, I am on track to be in the 20% wettest years, but the first of the winter annual grasses has changed colour, wow what a change, I just peered bleary eyed out the window Wednesday morning and it looked like it had been photo-shopped.
Power line technicians earned their money here yesterday the storm damaged a transmission line, towed the big cranes into the site with bulldozers and helicopters swarmed for the men and gear. My grandfather used to call it tiger country, not everyone that goes in, makes it out. Needless to say I didn't get to slob on the couch and watch one of the few games of AFL I had penciled in this year. They are calling it the game of the decade just to rub it in.

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Pam,

Alas we have been hit hard, but despite it all, over the past week or two neither of us would have done much differently than we did. The editor is more stoic than I, which nicely befits her gender. :-)!

Yeah, thankfully Noah's flood was delivered here as a persistent rain. There are parts of the state where towns were flooded, and to the north of this mountain range, the creeks and rivers are running quite fast and wide which is surprising to see. There are also many paddocks that seem to be too wet for the livestock let alone getting a tractor in there. I can see one in the valley below that looks to me to be a new series of ponds…

That particular person is now on the "outer" and they have other socialisation issues. Most people I know fall into the same behaviours as your guests, but the problem with that guy is that I have known him over such a long period of time. Anyway he has two children from a previous marriage and two disabled children with his current wife. He basically has 99 problems so I tend to cut him some slack, but due to his personal circumstances I rarely see him anyway these days so the whole problem is moot.

The land definitely shifts and you may be able to observe that in your part of the world? On the other hand it may be the actions of aliens, as that is as good a reason as any. Another concrete step is on the cards for tomorrow so the photo of the formwork should hopefully be in the bag!

Thanks for sharing your experience. And yeah, I hear you. I dunno, when it comes time to face the decision we all experience it differently. It is hard to know how deeply your connections run with other people until they are gone, but that may be my perspective. I prefer cremation too. It would be a very unpleasant thing to be dug up at a later date and the orchard could use the minerals... ;-)!

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Inge,

Thanks for the correction. Of course your humidity would seriously affect the salting process. And too much salt on pork makes it taste like, salt. How they used to consume that stuff on board long distance sailing ships in the far distant past is well beyond me. And the water (possibly from the bilge) would have been unpleasant too...

Well pork belly is very tasty! Yum! The editor is quite the fan of pork belly, although it can be very rich - but totally yum!

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Lewis,

Yeah, the rain was a total non-event, although on the forecast it looked totally epic. Now of course that does depend on what part of the state you live in and some towns were flooded and many of the creeks and rivers around these parts are now running very fast, high, and wide today. I can't recall seeing it like that before. The biggest rain I have seen here was four inches delivered in one hour and that was pretty bad (of course the 10 inches over five days was pretty bad too). In fact the town to the south of the mountain range (where I was renting whilst building this place) flooded in that early evening. There was water in the garage and it was almost lapping at the front door. Who would have thought that building houses along an old creek bed would be a good idea? :-)! Everyone survived OK.

Ha! That is funny. Of course inspiration strikes at unpredictable times and it wasn't as if I was walking along the road to Damascus and the big hand from way up in the sky pinned me to the ground and gave me certain instructions to follow... Exactly, that is so true. Speaking of taking a final form, I saw a very chilling video a few months back of a lady in what appeared to be a psychotic rage at a fast food outlet. Of course she was probably unhappy about the chips or something like that, but at one point in the video she made a chilling claim: "make me assume my ultimate form". Seriously what does that even mean? I'll see whether I can find it on the interweb thingee and we can decide whether she may possibly be possessed or not? Melodi Dushane, McDonald’s Customer Breaks Window . Weird stuff, huh? She was being ridden hard that day by something.

Yeah, I've heard the A-boot thing too and the South Park guys made much fun of that. A dead give-away for me is ending the sentence with an "Ay". I'm not quite sure what it means, but it may mean something along the lines of either: I've stated my case; or Are you listening to me? I really don't know which it is.

That is weird isn't it? I actually can't imagine that dog biscuit aisle. The supermarkets down here are currently cutting the number of individual items that they stock (SKU's are the fancy name for that inventory term) which means that the number of suppliers will also reduce. Apparently this is in response to the German Aldi stores operating in Australia. As a fun fact, and please correct me if I am wrong, I believe that that lot operate as a Limited Partnership down under and there has been suggestions in the press that as such they pay little to no taxes on their income.

The pea comparison with camellia seeds works for me. The seeds are funny looking things and I'd never seen them before last year. As to the tea, fair enough, I am no connoisseur of tea so I will take your advice.

cont...

Cherokee Organics said...

Ah, of course, I have seen those places in films. They do look a bit cheesy, but are probably a great deal of fun. OK, so I get the Tiki Bar reference now - and thanks for the explanation and brief history – however, why would social justice warriors (I refuse to use capitals with that lot) have a beef with Tiki Bars? Do they have nothing else to worry about? ;-)!

That is interesting. I used to write for that group. They were a good bunch of people. I'll check out the link. You know, mate, I totally hear you. I have sat in meetings that have descended into chaos about the topic of "aprons to be worn at farmers markets" and the person suggesting it never even bothered turning up to a single meeting. The whole thing was very strange to watch as it kept coming back like a zombie issue month after month until people stopped attending. The issue was perhaps pursued as a status issue by the leader of the group - or so it appeared to me at the time. The piggybacking issue is huge. But then peoples social skills are waning a bit. I'd like to see those social skills waxing, but it may be only a moment in time anyway. Oh yeah, I bet those meetings ate some of your time too! It is a good way to get nothing done.

Oh yeah, long winding e-mails are toast, apparently. Stuff 'em and their opinions, I enjoy long winding emails and what are those same people offering instead as it looks like total rubbish to me and I am yet to be convinced that it is a better form of communication? Strong words, huh?

People like texting because there is no dialogue, they simply send you text instructions, or even worse - talk at you and not expect a reply. It can't be good... And the grammar and spelling…

Fair enough about the Mac, I get that. Of course, it may be that hackers - as you correctly suggest - have bigger and easier fish to fry?

Did you ever get a chance to see the Star Trek film?

Ah, the third way... Dehydrate may be the way to go? We are planning on doing exactly that, this coming season as that is how prunes are sold down here.

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Steve,

Thanks for the beetroot advice. You may be interested to know that we are sowing the beetroot (and sugar beet) seeds tomorrow, hopefully as long as the weather remains OK.

That is interesting as I didn't know the pressure PVC pipes were that strong. Of course the glue and twist method is very wise. That glue stuff sets really fast too, although it probably takes a lot longer to cure properly.

Materials storage is a project for the future, so yup, every single critter that wants to live in my spare PVC pipes enjoys all manner of mischief in them. I do have to build racking eventually as the pipes themselves are 8m long. I now have to inspect them before I move them.

Yeah, the rain was very persistent but not unusually heavy. The forecast rainfall maps made it look epic. Still, if you were living in some towns in western Victoria, things may not have gone so well for you. Hey, Melbourne Water has rainfall gauge located up here in the mountain range: Mt Macedon - Maribyrnong catchment Rainfall. Woodend is a nice town on the elevated plains at the western end of the range. They have a very good bakery with award winning vanilla slices too. Most of the cold air falls off the mountain at that point and funnels into Woodend so winters there can be chilly and far colder than up here in the middle to south of the mountain range!

Thanks for the explanation. It has been very wet this year. Lake Eyre has definitely received its fill. I read the other day that Birdsville was under water...

Your grandad had a good sense of humour. That is funny. Yes, strangers can receive a mixed response in Hillbilly country too. It is amazing how fast that infrastructure can be repaired (I dropped a tree onto a power line once and broke it...) Ha! So sorry to hear! Well, the finals are upon us. I assume you are talking about the Geelong v Hawthorn game? Yes, old rivals play hard. I used to have a full MCC membership, it took about 20 years to obtain, but I eventually gave it up so that someone else could access the benefits.

Cheers

Chris

LewisLucanBooks said...

@ Inge - If there's a Harrogate tea motto contest, please enter me. "Yorkshire! Tea You Can Chew!" A really good cup of tea.

Yo, Chris - It always feels so strange when you see a place you used to live and it's either gone or damaged. I once sold a place and 6 months later it had 18 inches of water in it. A place I used to live in Seattle, now just a hole in the ground. The Seattle Public Library. New in my youth, declared redundant after (only) 40 years. I do and I don't know why people build close to water. But these days, we're getting water, so often, where there's never been water before. At least in living memory.

"Make me assume my ultimate form? A giant lizard? One of those lizard people JMG makes reference too, every once in awhile? Well, as far as psychotic rambling verbal mysteries go, it's right up there with "What's the frequency, Kenneth?" :-). Pop cultural reference, there.

SKU. Stock keeping unit. Remember that from my book store days. Right up there with POS ... Point of Sale. All that stuff they pile up around a cash register.

The whole hoopla about Tiki bars is that somewhere, sometime, maybe on a bad day, some South Sea's Islander (and, I've probably got the nomenclature wrong, it changes so swiftly. Were I to post that over on the ADR, some budding sjw would correct me, for a momentary thrill of cheap superiority) is feeling a bit exploited.

Ah, I'm pretty sure the Star Trek film got away from me. Since the surgery, I've been just a bit ... off. A bit out of sorts. It doesn't help that the whole digestive process from one end to the other is still out of whack. Probably a combo of the anesthetic and massive amounts of antibiotics to stave off infection. I keep eating the stuff that's supposed to help and steer clear of the stuff that doesn't. But as they say on Inspector Lewis ... "no joy." :-) Cont.



LewisLucanBooks said...

Cont. Finished off rereading the first chapter of Greer's new book. "The Wake of Industrial Civilization." Mmmm. At this point, the decline of industrial civilization (world wide) is pretty much baked into the cake. The "window of opportunity" to perhaps mitigate the shock, a bit, has closed.

Most people, if they think about it at all, sit around on their hands waiting for some world changing event to stave off the damage. A new super duper form of fuel ... the rapture ... whatever. The idea that someone else, or something else outside of themselves will be a total game changer. A wholesale change in human thinking, maybe. Another "Great Turning." In general, it's a state of affairs where the individual does little, and expects that someone or something else will cause a world changing event.

So. Greer thinks we're heading into a new dark age. Based on what's come before and some of the factors in play, now. Peak oil, climate change, global economic fiddling. He thinks that he can predict broad trends or overall patterns. Predictable patterns for over the next, oh, 500 years.

He makes it clear that it's not about specific incidents that make up history. Which would drive some of his reader's over at the ADR wild. They want to know exactly what is going to happen, in their lives, where they live, maybe, oh, plus or minus a week. Isn't going to happen. Since I peeked ahead, I know that he's eventually going to say that collapse is already happening, to some people, in some places. Lew

margfh said...

Hi Chris,

Internet has been messed up for most of the week so a bit behind here. Took the meat chickens in and they averaged 6.77 lbs dressed. Lost one to a heart attack and one to ascites so pretty good this year especially considering the wet, humid and hot weather. There are very few places that process poultry. One man waiting had driven 126 miles. We're lucky it's only a half hour drive for us.

Regarding texting, I find more people are trying to carry on a conversation over texts. I figure if it's more than a sentence or two just call. I agree that emailing is becoming less common. I confess I do have a facebook account - that's the only way to reach some people - another annoyance. Then you have to remember who doesn't use FB etc. Oh for the uncomplicated days when people just used a phone.

Margaret

W. B. Jorgenson said...

Chirs,

Ah, yes, I find mannerisms often give away who's which country far better than accents. It's funny, but in a lot of cases, the tiniest things give it away. I must say I see value in both cultures: Canadians can get along better (emphasis on politeness), but we tend to be less honest, since in lots of cases being honest about what we really think is rude. And good idea for messing with New Zealanders! If I ever meet one, I'll keep that in mind. Flight of the Chonchords? Never heard of them, but I'll have to look into them.

Thank you for the good wishes! I hope it goes well. I have at least two people who should be attending, as well as a friend I've known since the end of high school I hope I can convince to join. Well, soon enough we will see.

And yes, land should save money, not make it. At least, in my opinion.

Lew,

It's actually funny, our way of saying about is halfway between "a boot" and an American "about". The only time I've ever heard anyone saying it "a boot" is when an American makes fun of Canadians. If you'd like, I can give you a whole long spiel on this, but basically the human brain ignores differences it doesn't use. The sound in Canadian English found in "about" doesn't occur in American English, so your brains replace it with the closest sound, thus why you hear it as "a boot". Personally, I find this stuff fascinating, but I understand it's not everyone's cup of tea, so let me know if you'd like to hear more details on it and I'll get back to you in a few days (I don't have home internet. By choice, but it does mean I can't respond as fast as I sometimes would like)

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Lewis,

I totally hear you about the water. That was why I mentioned that the creeks and rivers were running so high and fast around these parts yesterday. All I know is that I reckon it may be getting hotter and wetter in some parts of the planet, but all things are subject to change. It is hard too seeing places that you used to live demolished and or disappeared somehow. I once saw a renovation that I'd sweated away on completely torn down. And another time, I went back to visit a house that I'd repaired from scratch as a shell and the new owners had done nothing in about a decade and the place looked dirty. I now don't go back!

Haha! Yeah, a space lizard dudette! I liked that REM song too and was aware of the reference to the TV dude. Back then there was no Internet either so pop culture references were hard to uncover. It was an unusual name for a song wasn't it? I must confess to being a fan of that band from the very late 80's before they got big. I didn't really listen to many of their albums after New Adventures in HiFi (which was the one after Monster).

Yes, and to think that they keep spruiking a cashless society. To me the credit card charge fees looks like a tax on business. It adds up!

No, that is so weird... Those SJW folk are strange as and they would not get one minute of air time here. Fortunately they are also probably well aware of that.

No stress at all about the film and I totally hear you about feeling a bit off. I would too. The surgery was very invasive and that always takes a toll and you may or may not feel the same afterwards. Mate, the antibiotics can't be helping. Those medicines are awesome, but they are often broad spectrum which means they kill the good guys and the bad guys. If there was an easier way...

Thanks for the review. I'm looking forward to getting my hands on a copy of that book. As far as I understand it we are in a long period of slow decline, but the whole adventure is pretty much toast. Of course, that doesn't mean that actions can't make a difference, it is just that I don't see many people willing to acknowledge the situation as it stands. I read an article by a leading economist who was saying pretty much that things are OK, so lets not all be feeling any doom and gloom, here's some statistics to prove that things are good, and anyway if you don't read the statistics you are a rank ameteur and should keep quiet.

Yeah, everyone asks when without even realising that a dollar ain't worth what a dollar used to be. I reckon that is a good indicator of the state of the economy which is in turn a good indicator for the state of our resource base and society. Yup, toast. I agree in that trying to pick the tipping points is a waste of time, but the general themes stand out. I see that day to day in product crapification.

I planted out the blackberries today and found that I had about 30 of the thornless plants. Who would have thought that they multiplied so much and so quickly. I'm putting all of the spiky ones (Raspberries and Marionberries) in a different spot by themselves.

Cheers

Chris







Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Margaret and W.B,

Thanks for the comments. Apologies but I have run out of time and will respond to your emails tomorrow!

Cheers

Chris

LewisLucanBooks said...

@ W.B. - Oh, I'd say I just have a passing interest, layman's view of language. I find accents and dialects, for the most part ... charming. Interesting in an off-hand way. I have a knack for picking up dialects. Put me around someone for a couple of hours, and I sound like a native :-). I'd like to think. It came in handy when I did a bit of community theatre, way back when (when Moses was a pup ... when dinosaurs ruled the earth...). It's never been a big problem, but I've always had to watch it a bit that people wouldn't think I was making fun of them by mimicking them. Seems like in the Inspector Lewis mystery series, some Oxford don is always tweaking Lewis for his Geordie accent for from being from "up north."

Yo, Chris - It's always a bit shocking to see water, where there hasn't been water, before. I think I've mentioned that every time we have a bit of flooding here, it always acts different. Given the vast drainage of rivers, streams and creeks. Where it rains hardest ... where a storm stalls.

Well, our Pacific Northwest weather guru has made his pronouncement for this winter's weather. Subject to change :-)

"So it is probable that we will experience a Neutral-type winter, which has implications for the upcoming weather here in the NW. Remember there is no certainty here, but rather the atmospheric "dice" are weighted toward the following weather conditions in the Northwest during La Nina years:

1. Near normal precipitation and temperature.
2. Greater chance of extreme weather such as heavy precipitation, windstorms, big snowstorms.
Remember these big events are still rare, but they do have a tendency to occur in Neutral years.

We also might expect normal reservoir conditions going into next summer."

That from Cliff Mass' blog. This sounds more like what I think of as a "normal" winter. I just hope we don't have those arctic blasts that drag on for weeks. We had one or two last winter, but they only lasted 3 or 4 days. Subject to change is right. I was just over at his blog, to do a copy and paste and he has a new post up. The Blob is back!!! Don't know why he doesn't think it's going to have much impact. It sure kept things warm and toasty last year, in the winter. Well, for better or worse, Cliff Mass tends to understate things. Errors on the side of caution.

Like so many groups, I also liked REM's early stuff. But not the later. And their music videos were fantasmogorical fever dreams. Lew